Articles on Arctic

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Animals in the western Arctic have higher levels of mercury in their bodies than those in the eastern Arctic. (Shutterstock)

How we solved an Arctic mercury mystery

A new study demystifies regional differences in mercury levels in marine animals in the Canadian Arctic.
The Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker Louis S. St-Laurent sails past a iceberg in Lancaster Sound in 2008. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

As ice recedes, the Arctic isn’t prepared for more shipping traffic

New shipping opportunities are opening up in the Arctic as sea ice continues to recede. But travel is still dangerous and the region isn't equipped to deal with more vessel traffic.
Canadian Lt. Gen. Pierre St-Amand is seen on Parliament Hill in September 2017 where he appeared as a witness at a House of Commons national defence committee. The deputy commander of NORAD said North American defence needs to evolve to meet modern threats. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

NORAD’s struggle for relevance on its 60th birthday

NORAD is celebrating its 60th anniversary this May. New challenges face Canada and the U.S. now and in the coming years. How will NORAD evolve?
Scientists on Arctic sea ice in the Chukchi Sea, surrounded by melt ponds, July 4, 2010. NASA/Kathryn Hansen

Melting Arctic sends a message: Climate change is here in a big way

Climate change is transforming the Arctic, with impacts on the rest of the planet. A geographer explains why he once doubted that human actions were causing such shifts, and what changed his mind.
The captain of a Finnish icebreaker looks out from the bridge as it sails into floating sea ice on the Victoria Strait while traversing the Northwest Passage in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago in July 2017. The waterways of the Arctic are of particular interest to non-Arctic jurisdictions like China and the European Union. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Why the Arctic isn’t a ‘global commons’

The recent Arctic Council meeting in Finland shows there's still avid interest in developing the Arctic. Some are arguing the entire region should be considered a 'global commons.'
Chinese President Xi Jinping waves as he leaves a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing recently. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

What Xi Jinping’s power grab means for Canada

Canada has reportedly committed more than $1 billion to a Chinese investment bank. Is Canada unwittingly serving as a 'useful idiot' in Xi Jinping's grand plans to restore China's lost greatness?
A large female Greenland shark observed near the community of Arctic Bay, Nunavut. (Brynn Devine)

Caught on camera: Ancient Greenland sharks

Using baited cameras scientists have captured some of the first underwater video footage of the elusive Greenland shark.
The Norman Wells pipeline connects oil fields in the Northwest Territories to Alberta. Edward Struzik

A red alert for the future Arctic

There are many debates northerners should have about the future Arctic, but the development of oil and gas is not one of them.
The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is home to a great diversity of wildlife – one reason environmentalists oppose oil and gas drilling. US Fish and Wildlife Service

Why Americans will never agree on oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

Alaska and oil proponents are cheering a move to open up an ecologically sensitive part of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to drilling -- a position environment supporters can't abide.
Gates of the Arctic National Park, Alaska. Plants on the Arctic tundra absorb mercury from the air, then transfer it to soil when they die. Paxson Woelber

Mercury from industrialized nations is polluting the Arctic – here’s how it gets there

How do mercury emissions from industrialized countries reach the remote Arctic? Recent research shows that plants on the tundra absorb mercury vapor through their leaves, then pass it into soil.

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