Articles on Behavioural psychology

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Game theory needs to evolve to make sense of the complexity of what drives us to cooperate. from www.shutterstock.com

New take on game theory offers clues on why we cooperate

Recent research suggests a new way to look at the famous prisoner's dilemma and how the results could help us better understand human behavior and encourage cooperation.
The “average” Australian according to statistics is a 37 year-old woman with two kids, a mortgage and three bedroom house. But how “typical” are her consumer choices? Image sourced from www.shutterstock.com

Vain, deluded, indecisive, biased: this is the “average” consumer

Who is the “typical” or “average” consumer? Is there such a thing? What do they look like? How do they make decisions? Am I an average (or perhaps a below average) consumer? It’s something that comes up…
In 1984, British LGBT rights groups worked on behalf of striking miners. Flickr

Shared pride, then and now

The film Pride, which won the Queer Palm Award at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, is based on the true story of what seems to be a rare occurrence in human history: two oppressed groups (in this case…
Friendly or flirting? Science says you stink at telling the difference. Cafe image via www.shutterstock.com

A flirter’s dilemma: subtlety vs. success

Flirting comes in many forms: a casual gaze that lingers a half second longer than necessary, a light touch, an amorous expression, an overenthusiastic laugh during conversation, or even some playful or…
Watch your step in Copenhagen – no one else will. jacobchristensen

The 21st century bystander effect happens every day online

If you’re going to fall, injure yourself and need help, where is a good place to do it? Should you choose a busy thoroughfare or a deserted backstreet? Statistics and experiments in social psychology will…
A gamma bomb was responsible for Bruce Banner’s alter ego the Hulk, but for most men, aggression is the result of genes. Kevin Thai/Flickr

Temper trap: the genetics of aggression and self-control

Everyone knows someone with a quick temper – it might even be you. And while scientists have known for decades that aggression is hereditary, there is another biological layer to those angry flare-ups…
Subjecting job seekers to bogus personality tests, as the UK did, was a misuse of behavioural insights. Lucky Business/Shutterstock

The promise and perils of giving the public a policy ‘nudge’

Do you consider yourself a rational person? For the most part, you probably are. If something hurts, you’ll stop doing it. If you like something, you’ll buy more of it, but you’ll rethink your decision…

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