Articles on Burundi

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Presidents Jacob Zuma and Uhuru Kenyatta. Their countries are at the forefront of efforts to have Africa leave the ICC. GCIS

Exiting the ICC: South Africa betrays the world and its own history

Ironically the campaign to withdraw from the ICC was mainly initiated by the very same governments and heads of state that had earlier referred cases to the ICC when it suited their own interests.
South Africa’s planned withdrawal from the ICC is considered a detraction from Nelson Mandela’s “inspiring legacy”. Jim Bourg/Reuters

Why South Africa’s withdrawal is not a death-knell for the ICC

The ICC has made important advances by investigating cases outside Africa and completing ones that further define what is not allowed in war. South Africa’s withdrawal is concerning, but not fatal.
Sudan’s President Omar al-Bashir during a rally against the ICC. Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Reuters

Withdrawal from the ICC: A sad day for South Africa and Africa

The South African government's decision to withdraw from the ICC should not be seen in isolation. The African Union has called on its member states to withdraw from the court.
A policewoman carries a Burundi flag during a protest against President Nkurunziza’s decision to run for a third term. Reuters/Goran Tomasevic

Burundi and Rwanda: a rivalry that lies at the heart of Great Lakes crises

The competition between the two authoritarian regimes has become a fact that, given the regional context, is here to last. It justifies repression and indefinitely postpones democratic expression.
A maturing relationship. Chinese President Xi Jinping at the opening of the China-Africa summit in Johannesburg. EPA/Elmond Jiyane

China and Africa: there’s strategy but the search for substance goes on

For the grand plans unveiled at the China-Africa summit to succeed, Africa will have to cooperate more extensively. The larger and more successful nations need to become sub-regional leaders.
Maintaining law and order in Burundi is proving increasingly difficult as the number of militias organised along ethnic lines increases. Reuters/Goran Tomasevic

Why the world can’t stand by as Burundi becomes a failed state

The “quick fix” nature of the Arusha Peace Agreement seems to have come back to haunt Burundi. Ethnic protests threaten to tear the country apart, leading it to the path of a failed state.
The Nairobi-Thika highway is being built by China Wuyi, Sinohydro and Shengeli Engineering Construction, and is funded by Kenya, China and the African Development Bank. Reuters/Thomas Mukoya

Chinese investment: why the buck stops with African governments

China offers an alternative to traditional donors and investors in low- and middle-income countries. Adding to its appeal is its focus on infrastructure projects.
Vendors sell bananas in an open market in a village near Bujumbura. Burundians are being driven deeper into poverty. Reuters/Goran Tomasevic

Beyond political violence in Burundi: an economy in crisis

Whenever the crisis in Burundi is discussed, the economy is often overlooked, even though it is central to understanding the backdrop to the most severe crisis since the end of the civil war.
More than 100,000 people have fled Burundi since violence erupted in April. Reuters/Thomas Mukoya

Burundi and Rwanda at 53: what sets the conjoined twins apart

Rwanda and Burundi, once the conjoined twins of East Africa, marked over five decades of going separate ways since independence. Today, the difference in their fortunes couldn't be more stark.
Boys sit on a barricade which was built during a protest against President Pierre Nkurunziza and his bid for a third term, in Bujumbura, Burundi yesterday. Goran Tomasevic/Reuters

Why the election in Burundi needs a longer postponement

A week’s delay of one part of the voting in Burundi is not enough. Postponing the parliamentary elections only, even if it was for a longer period, would be inadequate in resolving the Burundi crisis.

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