Articles on Cycling

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In both Indian and Australian cities, cyclists who deliver goods and services have to take it slow. Malini Sur

Slow cycling isn’t just for fun – it’s essential for many city workers

Cycling is a low-cost and non-polluting way to make deliveries in congested cities. Slow cyclists should be recognised as good for the economy and environment, not treated like second-class citizens.
Share-bikes can litter our cities and be found in rivers, up trees, in gutters, and strewn around public places. Obikes in unusual places/Facebook

Three reasons why share-bikes don’t fit Australian culture

There are three key cultural reasons why a share-bike business model that could be successful in Singapore is much less likely to be so in Australia.
After nearly a decade of operation, Brisbane’s CityCycle scheme still needs to be subsidised. Ash Kyd/flickr

Here’s what bike-sharing programs need to succeed

Many short-term bike-hiring programs have been launched amid much fanfare, only for their popularity to decline soon after. Several key factors need to be in place for a program to work.
Beijing residents with a variety of approaches to urban air pollution. Bryan Ledgard/Flickr

Can facemasks help reduce the negative health impacts of air pollution?

In recent years the number of motor vehicles – and the pollution they generate – has grown astronomically, leading some citydwellers to wear facemasks in the hopes of protecting themselves. So do they work?
The Netherlands’ cycleways are popular for commuting, because the infrastructure is safe, accessible and convenient. The Alternative Department for Transport

People take to their bikes when we make it safer and easier for them

The evidence suggests a small investment in cycling infrastructure, combined with less punitive policing, would enable more Australians to escape daily traffic congestion.
The relationship between drivers and cyclists is highly unequal, both physically and culturally. from

Cars, bicycles and the fatal myth of equal reciprocity

The primacy given to the car has shaped our cities, the roads that serve them and our very thinking about the place of driving in our lives. And it's a mindset that leaves cyclists highly vulnerable.

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