Articles on Electoral system

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An electoral officer in Benin. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye

Are poor societies stuck with dictators?

A classical political science debate focuses on whether democracy is dependent on development. The director of the Electoral Integrity Project revisits the issue using new data from African elections.
The recall is a democratic tool for active citizen participation and intervention. United Nations Photo/flickr

Flipped elections: can recalls improve democracy?

The recall is an ancient electoral procedure that has gained support in recent decades as a means for voters to defend the democratic state against extremism and serious abuses of power.
Tony Abbott opens the campaign office for Liberal candidate Ken Wyatt in 2010. Now he and all incumbent MPs enjoy a $300,000 advantage over their challengers at the next election. AAP/Dean Lewins

Budget’s $45m slush fund for MPs is an unethical use of public money

'Better Communities' funding is supposedly non-partisan: every electorate gets $300,000 for local projects. But only incumbent MPs have a say in this spending and 60% of them are government members.
Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha shows little sign of listening to growing public opposition to his military junta’s authoritarian rule. EPA

A year on, coup leaders rule with disdain for Thais and democracy

A year ago, a military coup toppled Thailand's elected government. The junta promised elections once a new constitution is adopted, but its authoritarian rule betrays a hostility to real democracy.
Ed Miliband’s Labour Party gained a swing twice as big as the Conservatives did but lost seats, leading him to resign. EPA/Facundo Arrizabalaga

Voting system gives Tories a result most UK voters didn’t want

Labour, UKIP and the Greens all gained much bigger swings than the Conservatives, but were election losers. The first-past-the-post system let the Tories pick up a swag of seats with a 0.8% swing.

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