Articles on Fish

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Pacific seabirds, such as this Great Blue Heron, can accumulate mercury in their bodies from the fish they eat. (Flickr)

Mercury decline in seabirds due to diet, not emissions controls

Mercury levels in seabirds living off the coast of British Columbia have been stable in recent years. New research suggests that this may be due to changes in their diet, not pollution control.
The evidence shows that both low and high fat diets can reduce your risks of cardiovascular disease – if they are plant-based. (Shutterstock)

These foods will lower your risk of heart disease

From donuts to avocados, food impacts your heart health. Here we delve into the science of how to eat -- to reduce your chances of cardiovascular disease.
Snapper is one of the fish under New Zealand’s Quota Management system. from www.shutterstock.com

New Zealand’s fisheries quota management system: on an undeserved pedestal

New Zealand’s fisheries are considered among the best managed in the world, but this perception doesn't match the facts.
Plastic trash on San Francisco’s Ocean Beach. Kevin Krejci

Bait and switch: Anchovies eat plastic because it smells like prey

A new study shows that anchovies – key food for larger fish – are attracted to plastic trash because it smells like food. This suggests that toxic substances in plastic could move up through food chains.
Tiny hairs cover the bodies of honeybees — including this one dusted in pollen — that allow them to detect molecular “fingerprints” similar to how home security sensors work. (Shutterstock)

How home security resembles dancing honeybees

Bees and home security cameras use the same complex techniques to monitor their environments.
A beached hoodwinker sunfish, the new species described by researchers from Murdoch University. Murdoch University

The four-year treasure hunt for the hoodwinker sunfish

A four-year puzzle has ended with the discovery of a new species of sunfish. These famously strange-looking animals are the largest bony fish in the oceans.
A shark’s nose is chemosensory only, and it doesn’t join up to the back of the throat like ours does. Flickr/Leszek Leszczynski

Curious Kids: Do sharks sneeze?

Sharks can't sneeze like we do, but they can do other cool tricks -- like making their stomach stick out of their mouth to get rid of unwanted stuff.
375 million years ago fishes like Tiktaalik (pictured, above) looked out above water for prey. John Long, Flinders University

The eyes have it: how vision may have driven fishes onto land

The first truly terrestrial animals evolved from ancient fishes that left the water for land. But what prompted to move has been a mystery.

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