Articles on Food labelling

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A government-commissioned report estimated that South Australia’s ban on genetically modified crops cost canola growers A$33 million since 2004. Greenpeace/AAP Image

GM crops: to ban or not to ban? That’s not the question

South Australia has lifted its moratorium on GM crops, while Tasmania has extended its ban. But the question should no longer be a simple binary of being "for" or "against" GM technology.
Most consumers are unaware that the Health Star Rating system is compensatory, and that one negative nutritional attribute, such as high sugar, can be cancelled out by a positive attribute like fibre. from www.shutterstock.com

Why the Australasian Health Star Rating needs major changes to make it work

A food heath labelling system Australia and New Zealand introduced five years ago is under review and needs a significant overhaul to make it useful for consumers looking for healthy options.
What is in these products? And if additives don’t affect your health, would you care? Shutterstock

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: Food fraud, the centuries-old problem that won’t go away

Food fraud, the centuries-old problem that won’t go away. The Conversation55.8 MB (download)
Dairy farmers used to put sheep brains and chalk in skim milk to make it look frothier and whiter. Coffee, honey and wine have also been past targets of food fraudsters. Can the law ever keep up?
Interested in a juicy burger grown in the lab? Oliver Sjöström/Unsplash

Would you eat ‘meat’ from a lab? Consumers aren’t necessarily sold on ‘cultured meat’

Cultured meat comes from cells in a lab, not muscles in an animal. While regulatory and technological aspects are being worked out, less is known about whether people are up for eating this stuff.
In a supermarket candy and cookie aisle. October 31, France adopted the NutriScore, a labelling system designed to inform consumers about the nutritional value of food choices. Defotoberg/Shutterstock

Front-of-pack nutrition labels: why are certain agro-industrial firms resisting?

France recently adopted NutriScore, a series of simple colour codes that will allow consumers to easily identify the healthiest foods. But some of the biggest food conglomerates are fighting back.

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