Articles on Future of work

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A photo of the last truck to be assembled on the General Motors production line, shown at a sports bar where GM workers congregated after their work work at the General Motors plant in Oshawa, Ont., on its final day of vehicle production, on Dec. 18, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Aaron Vincent Elkaim

Canada can better prepare to retrain workers displaced by disruptive technologies

The federal government must take a stronger leadership role to ensure the many bodies that co-ordinate employment training programs are sharing information to develop best practices.
A recent study conducted by Brookings Institute researchers found artificial intelligence could “affect work in virtually every occupational group”. However, it’s yet to be seen exactly how jobs will be impacted. SHUTTERSTOCK

Work is a fundamental part of being human. Robots won’t stop us doing it

As machine automation and artificial intelligence surge, there's paranoia our jobs will be overrun by robots. But even if this happens, work won't disappear, because humans need it.
Are gig workers lonely and isolated? Or independent and liberated? New research suggests despite assumptions about freedom, gig workers report feeling lonely and powerless. (Unsplash)

Workers in the gig economy feel lonely and powerless

An upcoming study on workers in the gig economy suggests the future of work may be a lonely and uncertain one for many workers.
Even though the future is unknown, Canada’s employment rate has risen steadily from 53 per cent in 1946 to more than 61 per cent today. (Shutterstock)

The future of work will still include plenty of jobs

Our inability to foresee the jobs of the future should be tempered by the realization that that jobs have always appeared in the past, regardless of technological advances.
Uber and Lyft drivers protest their working conditions in Los Angeles in May 2019. AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes

Worker-protection laws aren’t ready for an automated future

If your job doesn't currently involve automation or artificial intelligence in some way, it likely will soon. Computer-based worker surveillance and performance analysis will come, too.
Social and cognitive skills such as drawing conclusions about emotional states and social interactions are least vulnerable to being displaced by AI. (Shutterstock)

How to prepare students for the rise of artificial intelligence in the workforce

A shift to outcomes-based education will enable students to gain critical automation-resistant competencies to succeed and thrive in the future workforce alongside AI.

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