Articles on Health policy

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For some people, high out-of-pocket costs makes it difficult to see a doctor or fill a prescription. From shutterstock.com

We need more than a website to stop Australians paying exorbitant out-of-pocket health costs

Seeking and making sense of specialist fees is an unfair burden to place on vulnerable patients. A website might be helpful for some – but health professionals need to be held to higher account.
The number of Medicare claims Australians make in a year doubled between 1984 and 2018. By Sopotnick

More visits to the doctor doesn’t mean better care – it’s time for a Medicare shake-up

Paying doctors a fee for each service they provide isn't delivering optimal value for the health dollar. Instead, we should pay doctors a lump sum to care for a patient's medical problem over time.
The funding proposal is no fix for Australia’s health system but it could take some political pressure off the Coalition in the lead up to the 2019 federal election. OnE studio/Shutterstock

Morrison’s health handout is bad policy (but might be good politics)

The A$1.25 billion health funding boost isn't based on any coherent policy direction. It's designed to shore up support in marginal electorates.
The cancer Kaposi sarcoma. South Africa has large productivity losses because of deaths caused by it. Shutterstock

Cancer is costing BRICS economies billions each year

Policies encouraging lifestyle changes that reduce the risk of cancer could have positive effects on the economies of BRICS countries.
Around 3,000 more Australian patients have a complication in their hospital care in January than in other months. Rawpixel.com

Why you should avoid hospitals in January

New medical staff start in January and may not be as skilled or adept as their predecessors, meaning more things go wrong.
A scientist works with DNA samples in a New Orleans laboratory in 2011. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

You’ve got your DNA kit: Now what can you do with it?

The rapid growth of genetic testing and data-gathering could revolutionize health and medicine if governments work to protect people against privacy and societal risks.
As cities in developing countries - like Lagos in Nigeria, pictured here - grow, so do obesity risks. Reuters/Akintunde Akinleye

Developing countries could get sick before they get rich. Policy can help

Governments must understand that the factors making cities convenient and productive also make their residents prone to obesity. They must confront this challenge with intelligent, focused policies.

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