Articles on Indigenous incarceration

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Four Corners has refocused national attention on Indigenous incarceration rates, but there are several problems with prison data collections. AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Data gaps mean Indigenous incarceration rates may be even worse than we thought

The official data show incarceration rates of Indigenous people have doubled since the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody 25 years ago. But the problem may be even worse than that.
Northern Territory Chief Minister Adam Giles, flanked by corrections commissioner Mark Payne and police commissioner Reece Kershaw, speak to the media on Tuesday. Neda Vanovac/AAP

Evidence of NT detention centre abuse was there for all to see

It is surely extraordinary it took a Four Corners program, excellent as it was, to force the attention of Northern Territory and federal politicians on to the scandal of the NT detention system when most…
Birth registration is required for many activities throughout a person’s life yet in some states up to 20% of Aboriginal children aren’t registered. Marianna Massey/AAP

Invisible children: research shows up to one in five Aboriginal newborns aren’t registered

Around 20% of Aboriginal births in Western Australia between 1996 and 2012 weren't registered, new research shows. This has many social and health ramifications for their future.
Protestors in Perth call for an independent investigation into Ms Dhu’s death. AAP/Jesse Roberts

Why we should honour the humanity of every person who dies in custody

The statistics used to discuss deaths in custody can make us lose sight of the fact that it's people we're talking about. People with families and friends, who died prematurely – and often brutally.
The royal commission was highly critical of police investigating other police officers, but police remain responsible for investigating deaths in custody in most Australian jurisdictions. Rae Allen/Flickr

Scales of justice still tipped towards police who harm people in their custody

Accountability for the deaths of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people at the hands of the state remains absent 25 years after the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody's report.

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