Articles on Indigenous rights

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Three generations of a Wisconsin family with a nine-point buck. Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources/Flickr

Is hunting moral? A philosopher unpacks the question

What place does hunting have in our urbanized society? Is it acceptable to kill for fun? For conservation? Philosophy doesn't have all the answers, but it can help us understand opposing views.
The Tent Embassy in Canberra has for decades been symbolic of the tensions in Australian cities about recognition, reconciliation and land justice. Dylan Wood/AAP

How can we meaningfully recognise cities as Indigenous places?

Imagine if we did urban development in a way that honours Indigenous histories, knowledge and relationships with those places.
Gurindji ranger Ursula Chubb pays her respects to ancestors killed in the early 1900s at Blackfella Creek, where children were tied with wire and dragged by horses, and adults were shot as they fled. They were buried under rocks where they fell. Brenda L Croft, from Yijarni

Friday essay: the untold story behind the 1966 Wave Hill Walk-Off

The Gurindji people of the Northern Territory made history 50 years ago by standing up for their rights to land and better pay. But a new book reveals the deeper story behind the Wave Hill Walk-Off.
Native Americans have struggled for recognition of the violence done to them through colonisation and the persistent harms of settler colonialism. EPA/Mike Nelson

Indigenous reconciliation in the US shows how sovereignty and constitutional recognition work together

Despite significant shortcomings in the negotiation, content and honouring of treaties, they continue to define the nature of the relationship between most Native Americans and the United States.
There are some simple principles that would strengthen Aboriginal heritage protection. Monkey Mia, Shark Bay in Western Australia. Grant Matthews

Four ways Western Australia can improve Aboriginal heritage management

Aboriginal heritage has had significant protections removed in Western Australia. Following principles of respect and consultation would be a huge step forward for Aboriginal cultural management.
Police often don’t recognise that someone has an intellectual disability or brain injury due to a lack of training in this area, researchers have heard. Brian Yap (葉)/flickr

Aboriginal people with disabilities get caught in a spiral of over-policing

Police have become the default frontline response to Aboriginal people with mental and cognitive disabilities, setting this group up for a lifetime of 'management' by the criminal justice system.
Indigenous students who have experienced racism don’t do as well at school. Neda Vanovac/AAP

Racism hits Indigenous students’ attendance and grades

Previous research showed that school attendance by Indigenous students is negatively affected by racism towards them. In further research we have found wider school outcomes are also negatively affected.
Clouds of sulphur dioxide being emitted from the gigantic waste rock pile at McArthur River Mine 2014. David Morris EDONT

Indigenous communities are losing out in the development of northern Australia

As the Australian Government pushes ahead with its Northern Development agenda “making it easier to use natural assets”, it’s important to ask how this may affect the Indigenous peoples in whose territories development will occur.
Adam Goodes continues to demonstrate through dignity and presence of mind, that he is an empowered Aboriginal man. AAP Image/Paul Miller

Adam Goodes, dignity and Aboriginal men: what the research says

Adam Goodes' actions – from his celebratory dance to his decision to temporarily withdraw from the AFL – epitomise the concept of male Indigenous dignity.

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