Articles on Media

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Neuroscientists have been scanning the brains of select Super Bowl viewers to see how they’re reacting to the commercials that air. thaikrit/Shutterstock.com

The transformation of the Super Bowl ad experience

Companies are now tracking how consumers react on social media to Super Bowl ads. They’re also studying how the brain responds to them. Could personalized Super Bowl ads be on the horizon?
An 1894 cartoon by Frederick Burr Opper criticizes American newspapers’ elasticity with the truth. Library of Congress

A century ago, progressives were the ones shouting ‘fake news’

The practice of calling attention to false stories – with actual fakers then levying the charge on their accusers – dates back to battles between progressive reformers and corporate media outlets.
A Supreme Court of Canada ruling has triggered long-dormant provisions in the Competition Act that make preventing monopolies more difficult, especially in vulnerable media industries. (Bank Phrom/Unsplash)

Supreme Court ruling makes need for Competition Act reform urgent

The Supreme Court of Canada's 2015 decision to allow a hazardous waste monopoly in B.C. gave life to long-dormant provisions in the Competition Act that make preventing monopolies more difficult.
Consolidation is happening at a rapid pace. But who will bear the brunt of the costs? Khakimullin Aleksandr/Shutterstock.com

Defanged regulations have big media licking their chops

In the coming year, media companies will be adjusting to a new reality – one that ultimately leaves consumers with fewer choices.
Kids shouldn’t be expected to self-regulate the amount of time they spend on the device. And parents are finding it tougher and tougher to impose limits. Vitalinka/Shutterstock.com

Does Apple have an obligation to make the iPhone safer for kids?

The problem isn't kids owning smartphones. But when daily use exceeds two hours a day, mental health issues start to crop up.
New research shows Muslims are more negatively portrayed in the media than other groups. AAP/Lukas Coch

Racist reporting still rife in Australian media

New research reveals that about half of opinion pieces in mainstream newspapers and television are so racist they potentially breach industry codes of conduct.
Political reporter William D. Workman speaks at a GOP event in 1962. Courtesy of South Carolina Political Collections, University of South Carolina

Before Breitbart, there was the Charleston News and Courier

In the 1960s, white newspaper journalists exploited racial divisions to help build the GOP's southern firewall.
Businessman and philanthropist Joe Ricketts shut down DNAinfo and Gothamist after his workers voted to unionize. Dave Weaver/AP Photo

In an era of billionaire media moguls, do press unions stand a chance?

Joe Ricketts abruptly shut down DNAinfo and Gothamist after his employees voted to unionize. Is what he did legal? And how could similar events be prevented in the future?
Why has B.C. become home to Canada’s most vibrant news ecosystem? Credit the wellspring of creativity here — the province’s beauty and potential has long attracted change-makers. (Shutterstock)

A good news story about the news in British Columbia

A good news story about the news? It's true. In British Columbia, a digital news ecology is flowering through ‘coopetition’ – as Media Democracy Day will soon showcase.
‘When you look back on it, where else would those articles appear? The Saturday Evening Post?’ Nick Lehr/The Conversation via flickr

The magazine that inspired Rolling Stone

Ramparts started as a Catholic literary magazine. But when Warren Hinckle took the helm, he developed a layout, voice and rebellious spirit that Rolling Stone would go on to mimic.

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