Articles on Melbourne

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Ruth and Maurie Crow with a plan of their linear city. Image courtesy of SEARCH Foundation

There’s more to the compact city than getting dense

Ruth and Maurie Crow were early advocates of the compact city. They also warned 50 years ago that a clear justice intent was needed to shape cities for their citizens rather than vested interests.
Marvellous Melbourne, a city full of life, has been revived over several decades. This is Swanston Street in 2017. Andrew Curtis/City of Melbourne

How a three-decade remaking of the city revived the buzz of ‘Marvellous Melbourne’

The vitality that defines central Melbourne today did not emerge overnight. Rather than being born of one grand vision, it's the result of many astute, incremental changes that revitalised the city.
With water storages running low, residents of Cape Town get drinking water in the early morning from a mountain spring collection point. Nic Bothma/EPA

Cape Town is almost out of water. Could Australian cities suffer the same fate?

The situation in Perth in particular has some parallels to that of Cape Town, but Australian cities responded to the last big drought by investing in much bigger water supply and storage capacity.
Prime inner-city land, such as the Flemington estate, is being sold to developers to build new housing, but the public lacks basic details about these deals. Artist's impression, Victorian government

Governments have no excuse for keeping public in the dark on public housing deals

The Victorian government isn't alone in seeking private partners to renew public housing. What is notable is its lack of transparency by comparison with such arrangements elsewhere.
A vehicle, understood to be a white Suzuki SUV, ploughed into pedestrians in central Melbourne. AAP/Joe Castro

How urban design can help protect pedestrians from vehicle attacks in the city

The Flinders Street incident, in which a car was driven into pedestrians on a busy Melbourne street, underscores the need for new ways to design cities to protect pedestrians from vehicle attacks.
Cities like Melbourne are a store for such huge amounts of resources that they could be used as urban mines. Donaldytong (own work)/Wikimedia

With the right tools, we can mine cities

With an ever-increasing cost to extract dwindling raw materials, it's time to look at cities as urban mines. We're developing the tools to do that.
The Ballarat Road project in Maidstone and Footscray, Melbourne, will transform vacant land into housing for people at risk of homelessness. Schored Architects

Portable units and temporary leases free up vacant land for urgent housing needs

An innovative collaboration between government, a non-profit group and philanthropists has found a way to provide urgently needed housing on land that would otherwise be left vacant for years.
For suburbs like fast-growing Tarneit in the Wyndham area, ‘hard’ infrastructure gets priority, leaving ‘soft’ social infrastructure to catch up later. Chris Brown/flickr

Some suburbs are being short-changed on services and liveability – which ones and what’s the solution?

Traditionally, new communities first get hard infrastructure – schools, hospitals, transport – and 'soft' social infrastructure comes later. Liveability and public health suffer as a result.
Vital Signs takes stock of all the key elements of a city’s successes and challenges, and the Melbourne Lord Mayor’s Charitable Foundation uses this data to guide its grant-making. Lord Mayor's Charitable Foundation

Taking the pulse of a city: Melbourne’s Vital Signs

A decade after Toronto produced the first Vitals Signs report, community foundations in Melbourne and other cities are using these reports' up-to-date data to inform their decisions.
The Greening the Pipeline 100-metre pilot park at Williams Landing is the first step in transforming 27 kilometres of the heritage-listed main outfall sewer into a linear park and bike track. Greening the Pipeline, courtesy of Melbourne Water

How Melbourne’s west was greened

Tree plantings are making a visible difference to Melbourne’s west. It's the result of a collaborative model of greening, one that Australian cities need to apply more widely.
What a gas: one of Moreland’s new hydrogen-powered garbage trucks. Takver/

Of renewables, Robocops and risky business

A local council goes for hydrogen. A state government goes for lithium and mirrors. They are taking punts on technology. What are the risks?

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