Articles on Nutrition

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Most Canadians eat at least double the daily adequate intake of sodium. And, shockingly, 93 per cent of children aged four to eight exceed Health Canada’s Tolerable Upper Intake Level. (Shutterstock)

Dietary salt, the silent killer: How much is too much?

Most men, women and children in Canada exceed the tolerable upper limits of salt for their bodies. Consumers need to understand how much salt is too much -- to avoid hypertension and heart disease.
Sugar is sugar in the body. But the way they’re processed can make small differences. from

White, brown, raw, honey: which type of sugar is best?

Next time you're baking a cake or putting a spoonful of something sweet in your coffee, here's which sugar you should choose and why.
Alternatives such as dates have the same number of kilojoules as sugar. Artur Rutkowski

You don’t need to quit sugar to improve your health

Quitting sugar is unlikely to improve your health any more than cutting down on ultra-processed foods, eating more vegetables and cooking food from scratch.
The researchers looked at cancer occurrence in those exposed to higher intakes of ultra-processed foods, compared to lower intakes. Shutterstock

Research Check: will eating ‘ultra-processed’ foods give you cancer?

The study showed that every 10% increase in consumption of ultra-processed food was linked to a 12% increase in developing some types of cancers. But it didn't show the processed food caused cancers.
Non-compliance at mealtimes can be stressful for parents. However, research shows that independence at mealtimes is completely appropriate for children as they learn to discriminate based on newly recognized qualities of foods such as taste, texture, presentation and familiarity. (Shutterstock)

Is your child a picky eater? Five ways to fun and healthy mealtimes

A picky eater need not ruin dinner and drive parents crazy. Two nutrition experts offer simple strategies for happier and healthier family mealtimes.
South Africans eat too little fruit and vegetables. Food gardens in urban and rural communities could help. Flickr/USAID | Southern Africa

South Africa’s twin malnutrition challenges: hunger and obesity

South Africa has problems with hunger and obesity and both are linked to malnutrition. But solutions like taxes, education, regulating food advertising and labelling can help the problem.

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