Articles on Sleep

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Getting a baby to fall asleep can be exhausting. Marcos Mesa Sam Wordley/Shutterstock.com

Sleep training for your kids: Why and how it works

Adults are not the only people in the US who have problems with sleep – babies and children suffer from loss of sleep, too. Two pediatric sleep experts explain how you can help your little ones.
Many companies, such as Ben & Jerry’s, Zappos and Nike, allow employees to nap at work. (Shutterstock)

If you’re not sleeping at work, you should be fired

Progressive organizations recognize that fatigued employees can’t perform at their best. Naps at work can increase alertness and improve performance.
‘As a mom I couldn’t stand hearing my daughter cry herself to sleep, but as a physician I knew that sleep training was safe and that a well-rested baby would be a happy baby,’ says Stephanie Liu. (Stephanie Liu)

Why sleep training will not hurt your child

A doctor reviews the medical evidence on the controversial practise of sleep training infants.
Research shows that physical activity and avoiding screens before bed are both strategies to protect your teenagers’ sleep. (Unsplash/Andrea Tummons)

How much sleep do teenagers really need?

When teenagers sleep for less than eight hours a night, they are at increased risk of suicide, being overweight, high rates of injury, poor sustained attention and low school grades.
One recent study revealed no evidence that selenium supplements help prevent diabetes, even in geographical areas where there are relatively low amounts of selenium in the natural diet. (Shutterstock)

Why you should stop buying vitamins and get more sleep instead

Most vitamins and other nutritional supplements are unlikely to prevent chronic disease. Invest in good quality foods, sleep and exercise instead.
You know you’re not supposed to do this – but you do. Shutterstock

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: the science of sleep and the economics of sleeplessness

The science of sleep and the economics of sleeplessness. The Conversation, CC BY52.8 MB (download)
Only about one quarter Australians report getting eight or more hours of sleep. And in pre-industrial times, it was seen as normal to wake for a few hours in the middle of the night and chat or work.

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