Articles on South America

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Many of Latin America’s leftist ‘revolutions’ are now in crisis. But the left is resurging in some countries. The Conversation / Photo Claudia Daut/Reuters

The Latin American left isn’t dead yet

Progressives are leading in the presidential elections of Argentina, Uruguay and Bolivia, bucking the region's recent rightward trend. But there are lessons in the failures of leftists past.
Venezuelans hoping to cross into Ecuador via Colombia amass at the Rumichaca border bridge in Tulcan, Ecuador, as new visa restrictions limiting migration took effect, Aug. 26, 2019. Reuters/Daniel Tapia

Latin America shuts out desperate Venezuelans but Colombia’s border remains open – for now

Citing national security, Ecuador, Peru and Chile have all made it harder for Venezuelan migrants to enter the country, and xenophobia is rising across the region – even in more welcoming Colombia.
The Paraguayan Chaco, South America’s second largest forest, is rapidly disappearing as agriculture extends deeper into what was once forest. Here, isolated stands of trees remain amid the farms. Joel E. Correia

South America’s second-largest forest is also burning – and ‘environmentally friendly’ charcoal is subsidizing its destruction

The cleared land of Paraguay's Chaco forest produces everyday products like charcoal and leather that are sold abroad to consumers who may never know the unsavory origins of their purchases.
Members of the Huni Kuin community survey the damage after a fire on August 22. Centro Huwã Karu Yuxibu via Facebook

Amazon in flames: Brazil’s Huni Kuin indigenous people count the social costs of fire and conflict

Huwã Karu Yuxibu, the cultural centre of the Huni Kuin indigenous group in the Amazonian state of Acre, was destroyed by fire in August.
FARC commander Iván Márquez issued a return to armed struggle in a video posted Aug. 29, 2019. Reuters TV (screengrab)

Colombia’s peace process under stress: 6 essential reads

Dissidents in Colombia's FARC guerrillas are threatening to renew armed struggle three years after signing a landmark peace deal. Here, experts explain the history of Colombia's fragile peace process.
Students at the Parana Federal University in Curitiba, Brazil, protest planned cuts to federal spending on higher education planned by President Jair Bolsonaro’s right-wing government, May 30, 2019. The banner reads ‘In defense of education.’ Reuters/Rodolfo Buhrer

Brazilian universities fear Bolsonaro plan to eliminate humanities and slash public education budgets

Brazil's new president was elected on promises to radically restructure Brazil. But proposed education spending cuts and curricular changes have students and teachers marching in the streets.
Police protect a judicial complex where former FARC rebel leader Seuxis Hernandez was standing trial on May 20, 2019. The former peace negotiator has been arrested on drug charges and is now fighting extradition to the United States. AP Photo/Ivan Valencia

Violence climbs in Colombia as president chips away at landmark peace deal with FARC guerrillas

Colombia's new president opposes the 2016 peace deal with the FARC guerrillas. As trust between the government and militants erodes, at least 1,700 former insurgents have returned to armed struggle.

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