Articles on US higher education

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College yearbook editors in the 1960s juxtaposed pictures of traditional campus activities, such as Greek Life, alongside images of protests and marches. The Kentuckian, 1968

Beyond blackface: How college yearbooks captured protest and change

Recent blackface scandals that involve college yearbooks have overshadowed how yearbooks also chronicled important turning points in the history of US higher education, a historian argues.
Only 1 in 5 American students take a foreign language before college. pathdoc from www.shutterstock.com

Foreign language classes becoming more scarce

Despite increasing globalization, foreign language programs in US colleges have become less common. A foreign language expert says America needs to step up its efforts to turn things around.
Could a random admissions process help spare universities from legal trouble and save time and money? Adam Alagna/www.shutterstock.com

Why elite colleges should use a lottery to admit students

Colleges and universities are often criticized for how they admit students from diverse groups. A college admissions scholar suggests an admissions lottery could help make the process more fair.
Fresno State Bulldogs head coach Jeff Tedford and running back Ronnie Rivers hoist the Las Vegas Bowl trophy after the Bull Dogs defeated Arizona State on Dec. 15. Stephen R. Sylvanie-USA TODAY Sports

How big bonuses for winning coaches became a tradition in college football

While college football coaches who make it to the widely televised bowl games stand to collect major bonuses, history shows that bonuses for top coaches predate the days of TV and radio.
Public support for higher education has waned in recent years. HTU/www.shutterstock.com

What public universities must do to regain public support

In order to regain public confidence, universities must take steps to show citizens that investments in higher education are well-spent, an education professor and university professor argue.
Students prep for the SAT at a test prep center in New York City. Kaplan Test Prep

Test prep is a rite of passage for many Asian-Americans

Test prep is a prominent feature in Asian-American communities, which helps explain recent gains that Asian-Americans made in the SAT and ACT college entrance exams, a higher education scholar argues.
Students at Person High School use cardboard goggles to take a virtual tour of University of North Carolina campuses. Person County Schools

Virtual reality tours give rural students a glimpse of college life

A new virtual campus tour project in North Carolina could change the way students in rural or otherwise remote areas are able to 'see' prospective colleges without ever leaving their high schools.
Students who study abroad gain a competitive edge in the job market, research shows. Dan Korsmayer/www.shutterstock.com

More American students are studying abroad, new data show

In an effort to get a competitive edge in the global jobs market, more US college students are choosing to get international experience, an expert on study abroad says.
Public Service Loan Forgiveness can be difficult to get if you don’t know the rules. Rawpixel.com/www.shutterstock.com

What is public service loan forgiveness? And how do I qualify to get it?

A higher education professor explains the complex rules behind Public Service Loan Forgiveness, a program meant to provide debt relief to student loan borrowers who went into public service jobs.
Colleges and universities have been challenged to create more inclusive environments for disabled students. Monkey Business Images/www.shutterstock.com

College students with disabilities are too often excluded

The case of a student with Down Syndrome who was denied entry into all eight of the sororities at her school illustrates a broader problem of exclusion for college students with disabilities.
Researchers found that families who send their children off to college face an increased risk for foreclosure. Monkey Business Images/www.shutterstock.com

Thinking about borrowing against your home to send your kids to college? Think again

The odds of foreclosure double for families who send their kids off to college, according to two researchers who say their findings show a need for new ways for Americans pay for higher education.
The demands of college sports often take precedence over education. Don Feria/AP

It’s naive to think college athletes have time for school

Research shows student-athletes spend triple the amount of time on sports as on academics, raising questions about whether they actually benefit from a college education, a sociology professor argues.

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