Articles on Vaccination

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Could the yearly flu shot become a thing of the past? AP Photo/Darron Cummings, File

Influenza: The search for a universal vaccine

Flu virus mutates so quickly that one year's vaccine won't work on the next year's common strains. But rational design – a new way to create vaccines – might pave the way for more lasting solutions.
A baby cries during diphtheria immunisation at a clinic in Cibinong, Bogor, West Java, south of Jakarta, Indonesia, December 5, 2017. Antara Foto/Yulius Satria Wijaya/via REUTERS

Indonesia’s diphtheria outbreak: problems in vaccination and antibiotics efficacy

An outbreak of diphtheria in Indonesia is not caused by a singular factor. The country needs better vaccination coverage and distribution as well as better antibiotics.
Beds with patients in an emergency hospital in Camp Funston, Kansas, during the influenza epidemic around 1918. National Museum of Health and Medicine.

The mystery of a 1918 veteran and the flu pandemic

Many healthy young men and women, including military personnel, died in the 1918 flu pandemic. It's a reminder of how dangerous influenza can be.
Vaccines for the flu offer mediocre coverage compared with those for other diseases. PLRANG ART/Shutterstock

Here’s why the 2017 flu season was so bad

A better vaccine could have reduced the rates of flu, but not the high-dose Fluzone vaccine doctors were touting at the start of the week.
Signs from a protest in 2015 against a California bill that prohibits parents from using a religious exemption as a reason to not vaccinate their children. The bill became law. AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli

Anti-vaccination beliefs don’t follow the usual political polarization

Opposition to vaccines still prevents many children from getting needed preventative care. Understanding who is opposed, and why, can help, but the answers may surprise you.
A recent study of medical students and residents found they were reluctant to engage with parents who have vaccination fears. But listening to parents is important. Olena Yakobchuck/

The best shot at overcoming vaccination standoffs? Having doctors listen to – not shun – reluctant parents

A recent study suggests that shunning parents who are reluctant to vaccinate their kids isn't the best strategy. A better strategy might be old-fashioned, but it works.
Parents are concerned combination vaccines, which protect against several diseases at once, can be too much for a young immune system to cope with. from

No, combination vaccines don’t overwhelm kids’ immune systems

Vaccines against multiple diseases in one jab strengthen kids' immune systems, not weaken them. Here's why we shouldn't fear these combination vaccines.
Rwandan girls were targeted in the country’s successful HPV vaccination programme. Shutterstock

The secret behind Rwanda’s successful vaccination rollouts

Rwanda's vaccination programme for girls against HPV, the most common sexually transmitted disease was a huge success, thanks to implementation science.
Dozens of studies and numerous reviews have demonstrated the safety of vaccines. (Shutterstock)

Public health at risk when opinion trumps evidence

In an era when opinion often trumps evidence in public health issues, it's time to support and invest in evidence-based medicine to protect the public from dangerous, poorly informed beliefs.
A shot of fake news now and your defenses are raised in the future? funnyangel/

Inoculation theory: Using misinformation to fight misinformation

Does science have an answer to science denial? Just as being vaccinated protects you from a later full-blown infection, a bit of misinformation explained could help ward off other cases down the road.

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