A ministry program student at a Texas prison. Some inmates cite religion to avoid gang recruitment. Robert Daemmrich Photography Inc/Corbis via Getty Images

We spoke to hundreds of prison gang members – here’s what they said about life behind bars

Gangs are still a significant reality in US prisons. But most inmates say that their power has been watered down, and they no longer rule facilities with an iron fist.
Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s administration said it would reject all freedom of information requests – and then reversed itself after public outcry. AP/Teresa Crawford

Government secrecy is growing during the coronavirus pandemic

One more casualty of the coronavirus pandemic: open government. Since the crisis began, local, state and federal officials throughout the United States have locked down information from the public.
Census Campaign executive director Victoria Kovari looks over a Detroit map showing city neighborhoods that were undercounted in the 2010 census. AP Photo/Corey Williams

Census undercounts are normal, but demographers worry this year could be worse

How accurate will the 2020 census be? A demographer explains which communities are hard to count, how the coronavirus could affect the process and what's at stake.
Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee ordered all bars, restaurants, entertainment and recreation facilities to temporarily close to fight the spread of COVID-19. Getty/Erika Schultz-Pool

Governors take charge of response to the coronavirus

Federal government officials are on television almost every day responding to the coronavirus pandemic. But it's the nation's governors who are taking aggressive action in the states.
Telehealth gives patients at home access to doctors miles away, a huge benefit when resources are limited and travel is dangerous. Jae Young Ju/ iStock / Getty Images Plus via Getty Images

Coronavirus: Telemedicine is great when you want to stay distant from your doctor, but older laws are standing in the way

The use and support for telehealth has never been higher in the US. Hospitals and patients are flocking to adopt the technology but regulatory roadblocks remain.
SARS-CoV-2 virus particles (pink dots) on a dying cell. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH

What the coronavirus does to your body that makes it so deadly

The new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, spreads faster than the H1N1 influenza virus and is much deadlier. SARS-CoV-2 is particularly skilled at keeping cells from calling out for help.
The Justice Department is investigating stock trades made by Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC) after a briefing on the coronavirus. Getty/Mark Wilson

Insider trading by members of Congress may be difficult to prove

Did members of Congress illegally sell stocks after getting inside information about the pandemic from federal officials? A former lawyer for the House says proving such cases is very difficult.
People take part in a ‘applause for care’ flash mob as part of a campaign to acknowledge the work of employees working in healthcare in Amsterdam. Olaf Kraak/ANP/AFP via Getty Images

Express gratitude – not because you will benefit from it, but others might

Gratitude has a strong connection to well-being, but more than that, two psychologists say, it could have a powerful effect on others. So, don't hold back when it comes to expressing it.

Coronavirus and COVID-19

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