Issues of New York Magazine March 16-29, 2020 are on display at a newsstand in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan, Thursday, March 19, 2020. AP Photo/Mary Altaffer

Can I complain about coronavirus? Why it is OK to vent, sometimes

With so much sadness and loss from COVID-19, some of us may feel selfish if we complain about relative inconveniences. But because humans are creatures of habit, changes are hard.
There are many ways to make a vaccine. In a time of crisis, the more paths towards success the better. Adriana Duduleanu / EyeEm via Getty Images

Labs are experimenting with new – but unproven – methods to create a coronavirus vaccine fast

Under pressure to develop a coronavirus vaccine, researchers have turned to protein synthesis, genetics and hybrid viruses. It is likely a mix of these approaches will be used to fight the coronavirus.
A nursing home resident in Rome is moved to a hospital. Mauro Scrobogna/LaPresse via AP

5 reasons the coronavirus hit Italy so hard

The coronavirus found dangerously fertile ground in elements of the country's demographics, business, geography and culture.
Behavior is changing because of the coronavirus. Is perceived risk the reason why? AP Photo/Steven Senne

Americans disagree on how risky the coronavirus is, but most are changing their behavior anyway

Using a survey taken from March 10 – March 16, social scientists tried to untangle the complicated connection between feelings of vulnerability and behavior change in response to the coronavirus.
Crinolines, by design, made physical contact nearly impossible. Hulton Archive/Stringer via Getty Images

The fashionable history of social distancing

In the past, maintaining physical distance was an important aspect of public life – and clothes played a big role.
An employee in Nantong, China, checks the production of chloroquine phosphate, an old drug for the treatment of malaria. Feature China/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Could chloroquine treat coronavirus? 5 questions answered about a promising, problematic and unproven use for an antimalarial drug

A medicinal chemist addresses questions about chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine: what it is, whether it is effective against COVID-19 and whether it can treat and/or prevent this disease.
Leaders of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska voted to postpone the 85th Annual Tribal Assembly because of the pandemic. Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska

Tribal leaders face great need and don’t have enough resources to respond to the coronavirus pandemic

American Indians and Alaska Natives are the most impoverished and marginalized group in the US. Tribes are working to protect their people from the coronavirus, but they have few resources to do so.

Coronavirus and COVID-19

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Most Read past week

  1. 5 reasons the coronavirus hit Italy so hard
  2. Could chloroquine treat coronavirus? 5 questions answered about a promising, problematic and unproven use for an antimalarial drug
  3. Another housing crisis is coming – and bailouts and eviction freezes won’t be enough to prevent many from losing their homes
  4. COVID-19 closures could hit historically black colleges particularly hard
  5. ‘My first question every time I see a new patient now is: Could this be COVID-19?’ A Seattle doctor on the frontlines

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