Arts + Culture – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

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Long Island City’s 5Pointz, a mecca for graffiti artists, was demolished in 2014. AP Photo/Frank Franklin II

What the 5Pointz ruling means for street artists

A judge in New York City just awarded graffiti artists US$6.7 million after a developer whitewashed their murals. On the surface, it seems like a huge victory for street artists. But could it backfire?
Even common knowledge isn’t immune. ledokolua/Shutterstock.com

Writing’s power to deceive

Reading something that sows doubt about a widely agreed-upon fact – even the election of George Washington as president – can have a profound effect.
DACA supporters march to the Immigration and Customs Enforcement office to protest after the September 2017 announcement that the program would be suspended with a six-month delay. AP Photo/Matt York

In the DACA debate, which version of America – nice or nasty – will prevail?

Throughout America's history, a duality has existed: On one side, there has been the belligerent, aggressive America. On the other, the generous, amiable one.
South Korean chefs prepare bibimbap, a signature Korean dish, for the Korean Food Festival. AP Photo/Lee Jin-man

A look at Pyeongchang’s heartwarming cuisine

The mountainous Gangwon province, home of the 2018 Olympics, boasts some unique fare. A Korean professor describes her favorite dishes, from Korean surf and turf to tofu as soft as ice cream.
Neuroscientists have been scanning the brains of select Super Bowl viewers to see how they’re reacting to the commercials that air. thaikrit/Shutterstock.com

The transformation of the Super Bowl ad experience

Companies are now tracking how consumers react on social media to Super Bowl ads. They’re also studying how the brain responds to them. Could personalized Super Bowl ads be on the horizon?
An 1894 cartoon by Frederick Burr Opper criticizes American newspapers’ elasticity with the truth. Library of Congress

A century ago, progressives were the ones shouting ‘fake news’

The practice of calling attention to false stories – with actual fakers then levying the charge on their accusers – dates back to battles between progressive reformers and corporate media outlets.
A connection can be made in between Ursula Le Guin’s fiction and her father’s groundbreaking work in anthropology. Oregon State University

The education of Ursula Le Guin

Le Guin's father, Alfred Kroeber, was at a forefront of a movement that rejected social Darwinism and cultural superiority. In his daughter's fiction, we see these ideas come to life.
North Korean women work at the cashier table of a bookstore in Pyongyang, North Korea. AP Photo/Ng Han Guan

Inside North Korea’s literary fiction factory

The state-produced stories, which include tales about apartment lotteries, theme parks and the Clintons, might seem absurd. But they offer a window into the regime's priorities and anxieties.
Jihyun Park finds joy in the little things many take for granted, whether it’s being able to drop her kids off at school or having family dinners.

For a North Korean refugee raising her kids in the UK, the past is never far

Jihyun Park escaped North Korea and is now living in Manchester. But how to explain her scars to her children? Or why they can't call their relatives still living in North Korea?
Although measures of teen and adult happiness dropped during the high unemployment rates of the Great Recession, it didn’t rebound when the economy started to improve. ASDF_MEDIA/Shutterstock.com

What might explain the unhappiness epidemic?

Changes in how we're spending our free time is a likely culprit.
Tommy Wiseau clutches a football in ‘The Room,’ the 2003 film he wrote, produced and starred in. Wiseau Films

What makes some art so bad that it’s good?

Sometimes a work of art is characterized by a string of failures, but nonetheless ends up being a gorgeous freak accident of nature.
The Philadelphia Eagles’ defense has allowed only 33 points over its past four games. AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

Does defense actually win championships?

Does the Eagles' vaunted defense give them an edge? Cal State Northridge's sport psychology lab ran a regression analysis to test the popular adage.
Consolidation is happening at a rapid pace. But who will bear the brunt of the costs? Khakimullin Aleksandr/Shutterstock.com

Defanged regulations have big media licking their chops

In the coming year, media companies will be adjusting to a new reality – one that ultimately leaves consumers with fewer choices.