Education – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

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There are about 20 million college students in the U.S. Monkey Business Images/www.shutterstock.com

More college students expected to vote in 2018 midterms

More college students are registered to vote in the November midterm elections this year than they were in 2014, but it remains to be seen how many more will vote.
‘Fortnite’ has over 125 million players worldwide. Jennie Book/www.shutterstock.com

‘Fortnite’ teaches the wrong lessons

'Fortnite' – the wildly popular video game – is a dangerously addictive, robs students of precious time and teaches individualism instead of cooperating to survive, a political theorist argues.
The demands of college sports often take precedence over education. Don Feria/AP

It’s naive to think college athletes have time for school

Research shows student-athletes spend triple the amount of time on sports as on academics, raising questions about whether they actually benefit from a college education, a sociology professor argues.
Evacuees arrive at the UNLV Thomas & Mack Center after a gunman opened fire Oct. 1, 2017 in Las Vegas. Al Powers/AP

We provided psychological first aid after the Las Vegas shooting – here’s what we learned

One year after the Oct. 1 shooting massacre in Las Vegas, a team of scholars from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas offers insights into how to best help those affected by the violence.
The revelry that comes with college football comes with a serious social cost. Sergey Nivens/www.shutterstock.com

Big game days in college football linked with sexual assault

Reports of sexual assault increase by as much as 41 percent when the local college football team plays, according to researchers who say the increase is related to the drinking culture on campus.
Teacher turnover causes significant disruptions to the school year, researchers say. Rob Marmion/www.shutterstock.com

Teacher turnover is a problem – here’s how to fix it

About 16 percent of all teachers change schools or leave teaching. Often, these changes occur in the middle of the school year, which causes significant setbacks in learning, researchers say.
Black students who express an interest in racial justice are less likely to get a response from predominantly white, private liberal arts colleges, new research shows. AshTproductions/www.shutterstock.com

Black student activists face penalty in college admissions

New research by sociologist Ted Thornhill shows that black students who indicate they plan to fight for racial justice are more likely to be ignored by white admissions counselors.
A Texas school’s tribute to the school shooting in Parkland, Florida. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Why there’s so much inconsistency in school shooting data

The Department of Education says there were 240 school shootings during a recent school year. Another database only counts 29. How could the numbers be so different -- and who is right?
Collaboration across disciplines is key to solving the world’s toughest problems, researchers argue. Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock

Want to solve the world’s problems? Try working together across disciplines

Labor Day is an excellent time for college instructors to commit to teaching students to take an interdisciplinary approach to solving the world's toughest problems, three professors argue.
Has the cost of higher education in the U.S. put college out of financial reach? DRogatnev/www.shutterstock.com

Making college more affordable

As students head back to campus, the ever higher cost of a college education is once again top of mind. The presidents of Colorado College, Penn State and Xavier University weigh in on what's to be done.
Black power militant H. Rap Brown and Stokely Carmichael (right) appeared at a sit-in protest at Columbia University in New York City on April 26, 1968. AP

1968 protests at Columbia University called attention to ‘Gym Crow’ and got worldwide attention

The 1968 protests at Columbia University led the institution to abandon a gym project that residents considered racist and cut off its defense work – and generated worldwide attention in the process.
Protesters toppled the ‘Silent Sam’ Confederate statue on Aug. 20 at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Gerry Broome/AP

Tearing down Confederate statues leaves structural racism intact

Toppling statues devoted to Confederate soldiers may be a joyous moment for protesters who fight white supremacy, but after the statues fall, structural racism remains, a scholar on slavery argues.