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Las inundaciones que provocaron huracán María en Puerto Rico en 2017 resultaron desastrosas para los residentes. Pero para los peces fueron nativos fueron un alivio después de muchos años de sequía. Reuters/Alvin Baez

Cómo los huracanes fuertes benefician a los peces caribeños

Las tormentas grandes que traen mucha lluvia pueden restaurar el balance natural entre los peces nativos y las especies importadas, según informa un nuevo estudio del Caribe.
Venezuelans hoping to cross into Ecuador via Colombia amass at the Rumichaca border bridge in Tulcan, Ecuador, as new visa restrictions limiting migration took effect, Aug. 26, 2019. Reuters/Daniel Tapia

Latin America shuts out desperate Venezuelans but Colombia’s border remains open – for now

Citing national security, Ecuador, Peru and Chile have all made it harder for Venezuelan migrants to enter the country, and xenophobia is rising across the region – even in more welcoming Colombia.
‘Trump,’ says one of Europe’s leading right-wing figures, ‘has given me back the belief in the other America that I never had.’ REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Trump’s America shines bright for Europe’s radical New Right

The U.S. under Trump is no longer seen as the enemy by Europe's New Right, who are the ideological descendants of the original fascists. With Trump's rise, they have a new hero in an unexpected place.
A soldier participates in a training during a tactical leader’s exercise at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

America now solves problems with troops, not diplomats

Data show that the US intervenes more in other countries' affairs than it did in the past. It also currently hires fewer career professionals for ambassadorial or foreign affairs positions.
President Richard Nixon, left, and President Donald Trump, right. AP//Frank C. Curtin; REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Trump’s bad Nixon imitation may cost him the presidency

President Trump solicited foreign help for his presidential campaign. So did presidential candidate Richard Nixon. The difference, writes scholar Ken Hughes, is that Nixon was more skilled at it.
North Carolina Electoral College representatives sign the Certificates of Vote in December 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake

The Electoral College will never make everyone happy

A quirk of mathematics gives voters in some small states, like Rhode Island and Nebraska, an extra edge over voters in other states. This happens not only in the US, but in other countries, too.
When people feel threatened, they’re more receptive to politicians who espouse xenophobic rhetoric. Trybex/Shutterstock.com

Could climate change fuel the rise of right-wing nationalism?

Some view a retreat from democracy and the escalating effects of climate change as an unfortunate coincidence. But a new study shows that the two trends may be more closely related than we think.
Cubans record a street musician’s performance at an internet hotspot along the seafront in Havana, July 14, 2018. Reuters/Alexandre Meneghini

Fidel’s Cuba is long gone

Some Cuban entrepreneurs are so openly anti-communist that they sound like, well, capitalists.
The Supreme Court ruled that baker Jack Phillips, owner of Masterpiece Cakeshop, could refuse to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple because of his religious beliefs. AP/David Zalubowski)

Christianity at the Supreme Court: From majority power to minority rights

There's been a reversal of power between religious and secular sides of American culture. The Supreme Court is now at the center of that shift.