Art

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In our image saturated world we are becoming inured to the iconography of “natural” disasters. Ed Keith/flicker

The poster is political: how artists are challenging climate change

It is hard for us to visualise the trends and processes of climate change, which are largely hidden. But posters - with their richly subversive history - are the perfect medium for prompting contemplation and action.
Australia’s Aboriginal welfare problem of the 60s enabled widespread theft from Indigenous artists – including designs for the one dollar note. Reserve Bank of Australia.

‘Dollar Dave’ and the Reserve Bank: a tale of art, theft and human rights

Australia's original $1 note featured artwork taken without permission from Aboriginal artist, David Malangi. He was later given $1000, a medallion and a fishing kit, but archival evidence sheds new light on the affair.
Why is Whistler’s mother one of the most persistently famous images in the world? James McNeill Whistler, Arrangement in grey and black no. 1 (Portrait of the artist's mother) 1871. Image courtesy of the NGV.

Here’s looking at: ‘Whistler’s Mother’

Whistler's Mother, which arrives in Melbourne on March 25, is one of the most famous portraits in the world. But James Whistler never wanted the sitter's identity known.
William Yang’s beautiful photography crackles with life. All the World’s a Stage, Geoffrey Rush,Exit the King, Belvoir, 2007 © William Yang.

Stories of Love and Death: casting a new light on William Yang

William Yang has, maybe more than anyone else, shaped Sydney's view of itself. A new book, William Yang: Stories of Love and Death, collects his iconic photographs, with scrawled annotations.
The British Museum owns a number of priceless pieces of Aboriginal art, and claim they’re the best possible home for Australian heritage items. Paul Hudson

Dja Dja Wurrung barks are Australian art – the British Museum should return them

The Dja Dja Warrung bark etchings are hugely significant Aboriginal artefacts. They're back in Australia for only the second time in 160 years. We look at the complex issue of repatriation.
Children’s learning improves across all areas when they get the chance to make and appreciate art. Shutterstock

Why taking art education seriously could boost learning

Art education is an important vehicle for all sorts of learning and knowledge acquisition. Teachers must be taught not to view it as a "second class" subject.
The devastation of bushfires gives way to the hope of new life – usually. William Strutt, Black Thursday, 1864. Via State Library of Victoria.

Bushfire art isn’t changing, but our response to it might

Bushfires are an integral part of the Australian landscape and psyche. These awesome forces are part of the cycle of renewal, but how can art help us come to terms with increasingly destructive fires?
Shutterstock.com

Click here for art

That traditional monolith of culture, the museum, has begun to embrace the digital world. As a series of projects reveal, the possibilities are endless.
Nigerian author Chinua Achebe, who died in 2013, wrote stories that offer students from all disciplines valuable insights about the world they want to fix one day. EPA/Frank May

How reading fiction can help students understand the real world

Students of the social and political sciences can benefit enormously from being taught literature, short stories and watching artistic feature films.
Something seems to be missing in the Australian art world. French Street theatre company performing at the Santiago a Mil International Theatre Festival - Ivan Alvarado/Reuters

Australia’s arts community has a big diversity problem – that’s our loss

Diversity is a vital part of a thriving art sector, yet only 8% of professional Australian artists come from a non-English speaking background. How can we beat "diversity fatigue"?

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