Art

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Detail of Mirdidingkingathi Juwarnda Sally Gabori, Dibirdibi Country – Topway 2016. Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art Collection Image courtesy Alcaston Gallery © The Estate of the Artist and Viscopy Australia

Here’s looking at: Dibirdibi Country – Topway by Mirdidingkingathi Juwarnda Sally Gabori

Mirdidingkingathi Juwarnda Sally Gabori began painting in her 80s, and over ten years created an extraordinary body of work. Her paintings are more like music and dance – depicting the stories of the Kaiadilt people for the first time.
The Archibald Prize has announced its finalists. They are, as always, a mixed bag. Detail of Michael McWilliams The usurpers (self-portrait) © Michael McWilliams Photo: © AGNSW, Nick Kreisler

Patchwork, ironic, serious and kitsch: the best of the Archibald finalists

The Archibald Prize is a curious beast – an art prize judged mostly by philanthropists. Despite this, there are plenty of finalists worth considering.
Angelica Kauffmann, Self-portrait Hesitating between the Arts of Music and Painting, 1791. Wikimedia Commons

It’s time for the ‘science of sensibility’ to return

Finding the art in science and investigating the science of art used to be common practise. At the turn of the 19th century the boundaries between academic disciplines hardened, but now new fields like neuroaesthetics are breaking down barriers.
Degas and Manet’s stormy relationship is expressed in a portrait Degas painted of Manet and his wife, which has been slashed, presumably by Manet himself. Detail of Edgar Degas, Édouard Manet and Mme. Manet (1868-69) Kitakyushu Municipal Museum of Art, via Wikimedia Commons

Friday essay: When Manet met Degas

Edgar Degas’ relationship with Impressionism was to be a stormy one, but his encounter with Edouard Manet in 1862 was a turning-point in his career. Degas went on to paint a portrait of Manet and his wife - later slashed in mysterious circumstances.
Bruce Beresford’s expansive art collection grew from flea-markets. Frank Brangwyn (1867-1956). Exodus (Study for a mural). Photo: Jenni Carter

From the Queen of Sheba to Jeffrey Smart: how art shaped Bruce Beresford

Bruce Beresford can't draw, but he has wept in an art gallery. A lifelong delight in a wide range of art – from paintings to opera – has influenced his craft from a young age.
A electric screen showing Shanghai Pudong financial area in a clear day, is seen amid heavy smog in Shanghai. What can art do to make climate change more real? Aly Song

It’s time for a new age of Enlightenment: why climate change needs 60,000 artists to tell its story

Climate change is such a big problem it's almost impossible for us to really understand. We need artists to mobilise on a huge scale to render the problem comprehensible.
Detail of ‘The Morteratsch Glacier, Upper Engadine Valley, Pontresina,’ by Albert Bierstadt, 1895. Wikiart

Using computers to better understand art

A new field of research aims to deepen, and even quantify, our understanding of artistic style. We use mathematical techniques to help discover novel insights, even in well-studied paintings.
Big Blue Lavender Bay, one of the three paintings at the centre of trial. AAP Image/Genevieve Gannon

Is your artwork genuine and who can you trust to advise you?

The conviction of two men in relation to the sale of forged Brett Whiteley paintings indicates that Australia needs to get its act together when it comes to authenticating artworks.

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