Arts

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Artist-run initiatives are a major creative driver in Australia’s art environment. Lesley Giovanelli 'Continental Drift' Articulate project space 2015/Silversalt photography

Small is beautiful: artist-run collectives count, but they’re facing death by a thousand cuts

Small arts organisations are facing savage cuts in May. These vibrant collectives are a vital part of the Australian art ecology, and deserve better than slow strangulation.
Sydney Biennale has recovered from the missteps of 2014. Lee Mingwei, Guernica in Sand. Image courtesy of JUT Museum and Sydney Biennale.

A surprising spectacle rescues the Sydney Biennale from irrelevance

Two years ago, the Sydney Biennale was at a historic low point. But a new, ambitious show puts the event firmly back on the artistic agenda.
Children’s learning improves across all areas when they get the chance to make and appreciate art. Shutterstock

Why taking art education seriously could boost learning

Art education is an important vehicle for all sorts of learning and knowledge acquisition. Teachers must be taught not to view it as a "second class" subject.
Cue: tumbleweed. Iwan Gabovitch/flickr

What makes a film flop?

Many films exist on a knife-edge ... failure is only a screening away.
Graffiti by LMNOPI (LMNOPI.com) in Brooklyn, New York. Carlo Allegri/Reuters

The artist’s dilemma: what constitutes selling out?

With more and more street artists partnering with corporations, it's important that they don't compromise their moral standing to earn a living.
Rembrandt’s famous painting – commonly known as The Night Watch – doesn’t even take place at night. 'Rembrandt' via www.shutterstock.com

How the painting got its name

The history of the picture title is really a history of the last 300 years.
From Afar on a Hill seeks to dispel misconceptions around the numbers, circumstances, motivations and the actual mechanisms for acceptance of asylum seekers in Australia. Company Upstairs

Too close for comfort: contemplating the plight of asylum seekers in From Afar on a Hill

From Afar on a Hill is an immersive theatre work that provides insight into the lived experience of asylum seekers and lays bare the arbitrariness of Australia’s immigration policies.
To bring arts policy into the 21st century, we need to update and correct the basic economic flaws that were baked into the mid-20th century model. Fabrik Bilder/Shutterstock

Leaving legacies behind: arts policy for the here and now

Turnbull’s 21st century vision for government provides an opportunity to fundamentally rethink arts and cultural policy from the ground up and move beyond its 20th century legacy.
The ills that afflict any society can be dealt with much more effectively when the arts are integrated into the national conversation. John Gollings/AAPONE

Finding our identity: arts policy and the future

What if Malcolm Turbull’s conception of "21st-century government" imagines a healthy civil society and a responsive economy that values debate, imagination, difference and surprise - all provided by the arts.
Senator Scott Ludlam said changes to arts funding will mean the minister will not need to publicly reveal funding recipients. True or false? AAP Image/Mick Tsikas

FactCheck: will the Arts Minister need to publicly disclose who he funds?

The Greens' Senator Scott Ludlam said changes to arts funding will mean arts minister George Brandis won't need to publicly disclose who he's funding. He said it's unbelievable -- but is it true?
Forget the doom and gloom about the humanities: employment and research in the sector continues to rise. Smithsonian American Art/Flickr

Are the humanities in crisis? In Australia, the sector is thriving

There's plenty of hand-wringing about the humanities being in crisis – but is that actually the case? In Australia, the sector is thriving, and policy should be made on that basis.
A 1893 self-portrait of the French artist Paul Gauguin (1848-1903). Wikimedia Commons

How computer science was used to reveal Gauguin’s printmaking techniques

Artist Paul Gauguin is perhaps most famous for his colorful paintings of Tahitian life. But for years, art historians puzzled over his lesser-known prints: how did he form, layer and transfer images from one medium to another?
Development is underway all around Sydney harbour – but has the public interest been well served? AAP Image/Dean Lewins

Sydney risks becoming a dumb, disposable city for the rich

The major political parties seem captive to an ideologically driven obsession to privatise public spaces – including the Powerhouse Museum site in Ultimo and other harbour-front sites.

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