Articles on Autobiographical memory

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Dwelling on the past, like writing in a diary, is part of being human and helps us form our identity. But not all memories are helpful. from www.shutterstock.com

Why do I dwell on the past?

Remembering past events, experiences or emotions is a big part of being human. But if dwelling on the past is distressing, here's what you can do to help.
Stories foremothers keep and pass on may be aimed at enabling future generations to leverage experience for growth and learning. This image, circa 1899, shows the Grey County, Ont. farm of the author’s ancestors. (Tracy Penny Light)

Mothers and others: My Aunt May’s memoir gave us stories to learn from

A historian reflects on the meaning of an aunt's rural and war-time memoir, flagged for her attention when she was aged 13 by the then-81-year-old elder.
Vinyl records and cassette tapes, the parties that went with them, and other hedonistic pleasures from our youth can form a big part of our identity years later. from www.shutterstock.com

Why we remember our youth as one big hedonistic party

Memories of our carefree youth help form our identity today. But memories are selective. So, were we really as wild as we think we were?
Brain connections determine whether you remember the wind in your hair or who was prime minister. Halfpoint/Shutterstock

How we discovered that brain connections shape memories

Neuroscientists have struggled to explain whether certain types of memory involve distinct parts of the brain. Now a study suggests it's mainly down to pathways in the brain's white matter.
Research shows that our memories are not direct representations of past occurrences. Flickr/kharied

The instability of memory: how your brain edits your recollections

Memory is an essential part of our existence. Who we are, what we know and what we think can all be derived from our ability…

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