Big data

Displaying 1 - 20 of 91 articles

Jane Jacobs holds up documentary evidence at a 1961 press conference during the campaign to save the West Village. Wikimedia Commons

What might Jane Jacobs say about smart cities?

In an age of data-driven urban science, we need to remember how Jane Jacobs gave voice to the multiple languages, meanings, experiences and knowledge systems of a vibrant city.
Not all data are the same. Image sourced from Shutterstock.com

Data access inquiry casts the net far too wide

The Productivity Commission's inquiry into access and use of public and private data risks failing to achieve anything meaningful.
The ‘Lose Yourself in Melbourne’ ad was onto something: instead of being directed to the fastest or shortest route, some people might want to take a diverting detour. 'It's Easy to Lose Yourself in Melbourne', Tourism Victoria

Why we should design smart cities for getting lost

If smart cities run on big data and algorithms that channel only 'relevant' information and opinions to us, how do we maintain the diversity of ideas and possibilities that drives truly smart cities?
Who has your personal data, and how secure is it? Do you even know? Card and lock image from shutterstock.com

Big data security problems threaten consumers' privacy

How should we address growing concerns about information security without denying society the benefits big data can bring?
All that computer power will still need a helping hand from our uniquely human expertise. Computers image via www.shutterstock.com

Beyond today’s crowdsourced science to tomorrow’s citizen science cyborgs

Computers are getting better and better at the jobs that previously made sense for researchers to outsource to citizen scientists. But don't worry: there's still a role for people in these projects.
Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament’s London to Aldermaston march, 1958: an early example of mass political mobilisation to achieve a specific goal. CND

Not so grassroots: how the snowflake model is transforming political campaigns

Political campaigns today are presented as products of bottom-up participation, not top-down direction. But even if a campaign appears grassroots-driven, it's likely to be run from the centre.

Top contributors

More