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New forms of life are discovered in high-tech ways that leave yesterday’s natural history collections in the dust. Detective image via

The modern, molecular hunt for the world’s biodiversity

Forget the pith helmet and butterfly net. Discovering biodiversity now is much more about metagenomics and the 0's and 1's of digital databases.
What do collections of dead butterflies do for their still-living counterparts? Andrew D Warren

Why we still collect butterflies

The dead animal specimens that comprise natural history collections contribute a lot toward scientific understanding of their still-living counterparts – and those that have gone extinct.
Loggerhead turtle populations are facing a brighter future, but many other species are still in decline, while for others there are no data at all. AAP Image/Lauren Bath

We’ve only monitored a fraction of the Barrier Reef’s species

The Great Barrier Reef is home to some 1,600 species of bony fish, 130 sharks and rays, and turtles, mammals and more. Most have had no population monitoring, meaning we don't know how well they are faring.
True Australians: hard workers, quiet achievers and generally underappreciated labourers.

Australia: riding on the insect’s back

Insects are largely hidden from view or maligned unfairly, but they make a tremendous contribution to the Australian economy.
NSW Labor has promised a Great Koala National Park to protect koalas, but what about more insidious threats to the environment? Nicki Mannix/Flickr

Key environment policy still unknown in the NSW election

NSW has nearly 300 threatened animal species, including koalas and pygmy-possums. Yet we still don't know the government's plans in one area that could pose a serious threat to NSW's wildlife.
The author, getting up to speed in Davos. World Economic Forum

When a marine biologist went to Davos

If you were to believe the tabloid hype around Davos you might be forgiven for thinking it’s a giant party where elite business types meet celebrities and dole out a few quid to the less fortunate of the…
Island getaway: Tasmanian Devils have been moved to offshore islands to save them from a devastating disease. AAP Image/David Beniuk

Ship Australia’s wildlife out to sea to save it from extinction

Australia is in the grip of an extinction crisis. Our unique animals, plants, and ecosystems are rapidly ebbing away in a process that began more than 200 years ago with European settlement. Feral cats…

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