Articles on black men's health

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Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis on April 3, 1968, giving the last speech of his life. He addressed social inequalities, discussing the low pay of garbage workers in that city. Charles Kelly/AP File Photo

How unjust social structures help some but harm others

On April 4, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in Memphis. At the root of the injustice that King preached about is structural inequalities. An expert explains what that means.
Providing tools to help African-American men with prostate cancer make decisions about care can make a big difference. michaeljung/Shutterstock.com

Doctors need to talk through treatment options better for black men with prostate cancer

Prostate cancer outcomes have differed between black men and other ethnic groups for decades. Could improving the way doctors talk and share information with black patients make a difference?
From left to right: Toya Tolson, Shawnte’ Spriggs, Sophia Harrison, Marcella Wright and Deborah Dyson. These women are aging with HIV, sometimes with other diseases and always with other challenges. Aamir Khuller

African-American women with HIV often overlooked, under-supported

More people than ever are living with HIV, but people may overlook the fact that many of these long-term survivors are African-American women. They face unique social and health challenges.
Mourners wait to attend the funeral of Heather Heyer in Charlottesville, Virginia, Aug. 16, 2017 after Heyer was killed attending a rally to protest white nationalism. Julia Rendleman/AP Photo

Why bigotry is a public health problem

As death tolls rise from hate crimes, a psychiatrist wonders: Is it time to treat bigotry like a disease?

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