Books

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There is renewed debate around the lack of honest representations of diversity in Young Adult books. Melanie Holtsman

Telling the real story: diversity in young adult literature

Debate about the lack of diversity in young adult literature isn't new, but thanks to recent campaigns such as We Need Diverse Books, there's renewed focus on why diversity in literature is crucial.
A woman visits the Scientific Institute in Cairo, Egypt. The role of libraries is changing but they are as relevant and important as ever. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany

African libraries that adapt can take the continent’s knowledge to the world

African libraries have more of an opportunity than ever before to bring the continent's knowledge to the world. They just need to adapt their traditional roles and functions.
Michael Mohammed Ahmad asks us to reconsider who the insiders and outsiders are in modern Australia. Sally Tsoutas

Radical, young, Muslim: the Arab-Australian novel in the 21st century

Arab-Australian identity is not some singular, homogeneous label. Rather it exists as a spectrum and contains more complexity and diversity than the mainstream media allow.
A major challenge facing writers who want to take on the Bomb is that conventional description fails. EPA/HIROSHIMA PEACE MEMORIAL MUSEUM HANDOUT

Atomic amnesia: why Hiroshima narratives remain few and far between

Hollywood has kept its distance from the bombing of Hiroshima, 70 years ago, and novelists, aside from sci-fi authors, have largely ignored the catastrophe as a means of exploring human nature. Why?
The burden of creating a more inclusive, fairer and more tolerant society is carried by the younger generation. Hadi Zaher/Flickr

How Australian dystopian young adult fiction differs from its US counterparts

There are many similarities between blockbusting young adult novels such as The Hunger Games series and Australian books such as Taronga – but there are also clear differences in their messages for the young.
Men at Work were found liable for copying two bars from Kookaburra Sits on the Old Gum Tree – a ‘fair use’ exception would have prevented this. Jolene Bertoldi

The Down Under book and film remind us our copyright law’s still unfair for artists

A new book and documentary tell us more about the story behind Men at Work's song Down Under – and the court case it eventually led to. They also prompt questions about current Australian copyright law.
In reading, we feel ourselves able to get up close and personal with a dead author. glassghost

What do we love when we love books by dead authors?

The reader who loves literature of the past seeks to forge intimate connections with those who are no longer alive. In reading, we feel ourselves able to get up close and personal with a dead author.
Paperback and hardback editions of The Book of Days, an illustrated anthology edited, designed and produced in three weeks. Zoë Sadokierski

The Book of Days: creating an anthology live at the Sydney Writers' Festival

As well as a souvenir of the 2015 Sydney Writers' Festival this anthology is a compelling argument for the future of books in print. Book objects are talismans as much as vessels for the content they carry.
Deciding on the winner of a literary award is, in the end, a highly subjective process. RebeccaVC1

Literary awards and Joan London’s The Golden Age

Joan London's The Golden Age won the Kibble Award last week, having been shortlisted – but unsuccessful – in several high-profile prizes previously. Deciding on winners is a highly subjective process.
EL Doctorow, pictured here in 2007, has died. His work in its entirety bespeaks a profound humanity. Radim Beznoska/AAP

Remembering EL Doctorow, the conscience of the USA

Over the course of almost six decades, Doctorow – who has died – wrote himself into the canon of American literature. He embodied the virtues of a classical storyteller.

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