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Old technology, but not obsolete. suksawad/Shutterstock.com

Why do people still use fax machines?

It's 2019. And yet faxing is still often more secure, easier to use and better suited to existing work habits than computer-based messaging.
A man holds up a joint during a 2017 rally to support the legalization of marijuana in Washington, D.C. AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Why do so many Americans now support legalizing marijuana?

As politically polarized as the country may seem, when it comes to marijuana, Americans across the spectrum have changed their minds. A new study says it's all thanks to the media.
A man at a recovery center in Youngstown, Ohio, smokes a cigarette, June 15, 2017. David Dermer/AP Photo

Who’s smoking now, and why it matters

For those who don't smoke cigarettes, the dangers may seem distant. Yet smoking still kills millions each year. A new study suggests that e-cigarettes might curb this public health tragedy.
Since the Great Recession, the employment rate has gone up — but some rural groups lag behind. Josh Sorenson

Rural people with disabilities are still struggling to recover from the recession

There's a notable disparity between the rate of employment for people with and without disabilities, especially in certain pockets of the US.
Millions of tons of plastic are manufactured every year. Bert Kaufmann/Wikimedia

The world of plastics, in numbers

In 2015, over 320 million tons of polymers, excluding fibers, were manufactured across the globe.
California’s San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station was shut down in 2013. julius fekete/shutterstock.com

The demise of US nuclear power in 4 charts

Commercial nuclear reactors provide roughly one-fifth of the electricity produced in the US. But they face grave threats to their continued operation.
An exam room at the Planned Parenthood South Austin Health Center in Texas. REUTERS/Ilana Panich-Linsman

Who chooses abortion? More women than you might think

One in 4 US women receives an abortion sometime in her life. Who are the women who choose to end their pregnancies?
About 12.7 percent of Americans lived below the poverty line in 2016. StanislauV/shutterstock.com

Why the war on poverty in the US isn’t over, in 4 charts

A White House Council concluded that the war on poverty is "largely over." But, while poverty among seniors has declined, poverty among adults and children as changed little over the last 40 years.
For many, the job of a pilot has lost its luster. Emilian Danaila/shutterstock.com

The US is facing a serious shortage of airline pilots

Over the last three decades, the number of US pilots has decreased by 30 percent. That problem is only going to get worse as demand increases.
What do we really know about homelessness in the U.S.? Dmytro Zinkevych/shutterstock.com

Busting 3 common myths about homelessness

Are most homeless mentally ill? Is it inevitable that a society will have homeless people? A researcher digs into the real data on homelessness.
Pro-life and pro-choice protesters rallied outside the U.S. Supreme Court in June. REUTERS/Toya Sarno Jordan

How Roe v. Wade changed the lives of American women

Over the past 45 years, women have married later, attained higher education and joined the workforce in record numbers. Could it all be turned back?
Hurricane Harvey approaching the Texas Gulf Coast in August 2017. NOAA/Handout via Reuters

3 reasons why the US is vulnerable to big disasters

Large-scale emergencies can be a strain, even in one of the world's richest countries. Population growth, income inequality and fragile supply chains may make the problem worse.

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