Articles on child welfare

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A trauma-informed lens asks people to shift from thinking ‘What is wrong?“ to 'What happened?” (Shutterstock)

Trauma-informed classrooms can better support kids in care

In some Manitoba schools, educators are working to recognize that the most urgent need for children who have experienced trauma is to establish the child's sense of safety in the school.
The Office of the Children’s Commissioner and the Ministry for Children have interviewed thousands of children about what well-being means to them. from www.shutterstock.com

Children had no say in New Zealand’s well-being budget, and that matters

When thousands of New Zealand children were asked what well-being meant for them, most wanted enough money for basics, good relationships and to be free from bullying, racism and discrimination.
Sophonisba Breckinridge and Edith Abbott. University of Chicago Photographic Archive, apf1-00008, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library/Bernard Hoffman, photographer

Same-sex couples have been in American politics way longer than the Buttigiegs have been married

Long before Chasten Buttigieg became a 'not-so-secret weapon' in his husband Pete Buttigieg’s presidential campaign, another same-sex couple profoundly reshaped American social policy.
Young people in temporary or continuing care need to be provided with educational enrichment programs to help identify learning challenges, remediate education deficits and foster a sense of connectedness. Shutterstock

Youth leaving state care need education support

Amid long-standing societal and policy issues that need to be addressed, young people in care deserve special consideration and focused attention regarding how to meet their educational needs.
Immigrant children separated from their parents who were detained at the U.S.-Mexico border arrive at a foster care facility in East Harlem on June 22. Rainmaker Photo/MediaPunch /IPX

For many immigrant families, the fight for reunification is just beginning

History shows that the US court system isn't sympathetic to undocumented migrants when it comes to parental rights.
The number of Guatemalan children adopted by foreign parents dropped from 4,100 in 2008 to 58 in 2010, after the country drastically curtailed the practice. Reuters/Jorge Dan Lopez

International adoptions have dropped 72 percent since 2005 – here’s why

In 2005, almost 46,000 children were adopted across borders. Ten years later, just 12,000 were. The foreign adoption system is imploding, potentially putting children's lives in danger.

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