Chronic pain

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Neuropathic pain often doesn’t respond to common painkillers such as ibuprofen or paracetamol. from shutterstock.com

Weekly dose: Lyrica, the epilepsy drug that treats chronic nerve pain

Lyrica, the brand name for a medicine called pregabalin, is an anti-epileptic drug most commonly used to treat chronic nerve pain - a type of pain caused by abnormality in, or damage to, the nerves.
Fibromyalgia can be made more difficult when the pain doesn’t seem to have a visible cause. Silvia Sala/Flickr

Hidden and unexplained: feeling the pain of fibromyalgia

Unexplained, chronic pain known as fibromyalgia affects up to 5% of the population. Yet there are no effective treatment options for the millions for whom each day begins with persistent pain.
Pain doesn’t originate at the site as most think, it’s created by the brain so we protect the area that’s in danger. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Explainer: what is pain and what is happening when we feel it?

Pain scientists are reasonably agreed that pain is an unpleasant feeling in our body that makes us want to stop and change our behaviour.
‘A gran don’t come for free’ Berna Namoglu

How music can help relieve chronic pain

We've learned a lot about how music can help with pain and a score of other clinical problems. But with chronic pain affecting a quarter of us, it's an area that has received too little attention.
Tension-type headaches feel like a dull or heavy, non-pulsating band of pain, usually on both sides of the head. RXAphotos/Flickr

Health Check: what causes headaches?

Nearly every second person in the world had a headache at least once in the past year. But these can feel very different, depending on which of the nearly 200 types of headache you have.
It’s not in the bones, but it might not be in the brain either. X-ray image by www.shutterstock.com

Chronic pain isn’t all in the brain, which is good news for sufferers

One in five of us has been experiencing chronic pain over the past three months, or longer. Chronic pain won’t kill us; it just makes our lives miserable. More miserable, research suggests, than for example…
Army recruitment: fear is a friend not foe. Matt Brock

Emotions affect how pain feels, as soldiers know only too well

Pain is one of the most powerful weapons of war. Western Front soldier and poet Siegfried Sassoon dubbed war a “sausage machine” because it tore through and crushed tissues and organs, and dismembered…
The term RSI has been replaced by the occupational overuse syndrome, or OOS. Image from shutterstock.com

Repetitive strain injury: is it real or imagined?

Repetitive strain injury, or RSI, is a term which was developed to describe an epidemic of work-related arm and hand pain reported in Australia in the 1980s. While work-related arm and hand pain was and…
While a flinch, or a grimace may provide us with clues, ultimately we only know that someone’s in pain if they tell us. the italian voice/Flickr

Understanding pain: can the brain provide all the answers?

We now know that there’s much more to pain than simply what is happening in the painful body part, and attention has turned to the role of the brain. But not even this mysterious organ can tell us everything…
There are some effective ways to balance the harms of opioids with its benefits. strollerdos/Flickr

Some ways to balance the benefits and harms of opioids

The use of opioid medication in Australia has grown considerably in the past 20 years, and so have related harms. This increase in use is primarily for chronic pain conditions, now the most common reason…

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