Articles on Climate politics

Displaying all articles

The Barossa Valley in 1987 – the year that Australians (winemakers included) received their first formal warning of climate change. Phillip Capper/Wikimedia Commons

It’s 30 years since scientists first warned of climate threats to Australia

Three decades since the GREENHOUSE 87 conference, credited as kickstarting public awareness of climate change in Australia, how far have we come, and how far do we have left to go in appreciating the risks?
The climate debate can give you a headache at the best of times. Confused person image from www.shutterstock.com

Australian climate politics in 2017: a guide for the perplexed

If you thought the climate debate has been ugly, you haven't seen anything yet. In 2017 Australia will review its climate policies, and the process is not off to a good start.
Presidents Jinping (centre) and Obama (right) have ensured that the Paris Agreement now covers 40% of the world’s emissions, bringing it closer to coming into force. EPA/How Hwee Young

US-China ratification of Paris Agreement ramps up the pressure on Australia

Unlike the Kyoto Protocol, which languished for years, the Paris climate agreement is rocketing towards the threshold for it to enter into international law – leaving Australia in its wake.
Turnbull might be hamstrung by his barely-there majority. AAP Image/Paul Miller

Can Malcolm Turnbull do climate and energy policy now?

Malcolm Turnbull returns to the helm with a wafer-thin majority and a significant element in his government who still oppose climate action - can he defy the odds and serve up some credible policy?
Malcolm Turnbull’s speech to the Paris climate summit lacked real focus, but he still has time to grab the issue with both hands before the election. EPA/Christophe Petit Tesson

Ideas for Australia: A six-point plan for getting climate policy back on track

Australia has been mired in climate confusion for years - as reflected by its underwhelming performance at last year's Paris climate summit. Here's how to get things back on an even keel.

Top contributors

More