Articles on Climate science

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2015 looks set to be the hottest year on record. from www.shuttershock.com

2015 to be hottest year ever: World Meteorological Organization

2015 will likely be the hottest year on record, according to a preliminary analysis released by the World Meteorological Organization.
Even if Exxon eludes charges in New York, the attorney general’s investigation sends a message on corporate accountability. mortaupat/flickr

In targeting Exxon on climate, New York puts all corporations on notice

Until now, the legal system has tolerated corporate deceptions of the public but New York state's investigation into Exxon on climate could start to rewrite the rules.
Satellite image showing clouds over the Greenland Sea downstream of the ice edge during conditions where there was a large transfer of heat and moisture from the ocean to the atmosphere. NASA

Declining winter sea ice near Greenland spells cooler climate for Europe

Loss of sea ice near Greenland and Iceland portend a colder future for Europe.
Another way to change the carbon balance: trees. Neil Palmer/CIAT for Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR).

Rather than divest, advocate for carbon balancing

Divestment campaigns aim to halt the use of fossil fuels, but the climate can be also stabilized through ‘recarbonization’ techniques, such as reforestation and changing agricultural practices.
Out of sight out of mind? The vast majority of global warming is going into the ocean. peter dondel/Flickr

The climate ‘hiatus’ doesn’t take the heat off global warming

Over the past decade, warming air temperatures at Earth's surface appear to have slowed. But that ignores the vast majority of heat going steadily into the ocean. And, a new paper shows, that makes no difference to the long-term prognosis.
Clumps of thunderstorms are driving increases in rain over tropical oceans. Image courtesy of the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit, NASA Johnson Space Center

The tropics are getting wetter: the reason could be clumpy storms

For a long time climate models have forecast increasing rainfall in tropics. Now we know part of the reason: clumpy thunderstorms.
Carbon dioxide levels are rising at their fastest rate since the dinosaurs’ time. iurii/Shutterstock.com

What will a hotter Australia be like? The past gives us some clues

The latest climate projections released last week by the Bureau of Meteorology and CSIRO predict that Australia could potentially warm by between 2.8C and 5.1C by 2090. Meanwhile, the 2014 State of the…

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