Displaying 1 - 20 of 129 articles

Mozambique is seeking to use renewable energy to extend electricity access to rural institutions. Joshua Kirshner

Mozambique needs a community-driven approach to electrification

Mozambique has long standing energy challenges and widespread energy poverty. To change this, particularly for people living in rural areas, it needs to democratise the way it supplies energy.
A tax on coal would increase the price, reducing demand but benefiting exporting countries such as Australia. Coal image from

A coal tax to help the climate and the resource owners

Coal exporting countries could buffer the transition to low carbon economies by taxing coal production or exports.
AAP/Lukas Coch

Everybody loves Malcolm – for now

I’ve been feeling uncharacteristically optimistic about the future of the country. Like most Australians, it seems, I’m infatuated with Malcolm Turnbull. My unaccustomed euphoria has been brought on by…
Coal no more? The rise of renewables and climate action will spell an end to Australia’s coal industry. Coal image from

The long-term future of Australian coal is drying up

Australia's failure to reassess its commitment to coal will have serious negative consequences, not only for Australia’s economy, but for the health and well being of millions of people and the global environment.
Carbon capture and storage would help the coal industry survive, but it remains elusive. AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Decades on, the promise of ‘clean coal’ remains elusive

For more than a decade the coal industry's favoured response to climate change was carbon capture and storage, or CCS. CCS is still the main defence, but the absence of functioning projects is making it ever more threadbare.
Leader of The Greens, Richard Di Natale, speaking on ABC TV’s Q&A program. Q&A

FactCheck Q&A: Will India no longer buy Australian coal?

Richard Di Natale, leader of The Greens, told the Q&A audience that India will no longer buying Australian coal but presenter Tony Jones said he thought that was wrong. We check the facts.
Federal Attorney-General George Brandis wants to remove green groups' blanket eligibility to challenge environmental approvals in the courts. AAP Image/Mick Tsikas

Brandis' changes to environmental laws will defang the watchdogs

The government plans to change the law so green groups don't automatically qualify to mount legal challenges against environmental approvals. That would make it much harder for green watchdogs to act.

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