Articles on Concrete

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An image from the New Art Gallery of Western Australia, Structural Engineering Brochure, 1979. Public Works Department of WA

Brutalism: how to love a concrete beast

Often described by critics as dehumanising, depressing and oppressive, Brutalism is having a moment – especially on social media.
Increasing heat in Sydney and other Australian cities highlights the urgent need to apply our knowledge of how to create liveable low-carbon cities. Taras Vyshnya/Shutterstock

We have the blueprint for liveable, low-carbon cities. We just need to use it

The research has been done. The evidence is in. We know how to create cities that are sustainable, liveable and affordable. But we have yet to apply that knowledge widely across Australian cities.
Could a secret ingredient make crumbling concrete a thing of the past? m_e_mccarron

Fungi can help concrete heal its own cracks

Adding a bit of fungus to the initial ingredient list might be one way to endow concrete with the ability to fill in any bits of damage that occur, without the need for human intervention.
The new One World Trade Center building, made with high-performance concrete. John D. Morris

How building design changed after 9/11

Tragedies involving building collapses prompt structural engineers to figure out what happened, and how to prevent it from recurring.
Illustration of pressure sensing bacteria in soils from the ‘Computational Colloids Project’. Carolina Ramirez-Figuroa, Luis Hernan and Martyn Dade-Robertson

The cities of the future could be built by microbes

Bacteria can produce their own 'buildings' so scientists are genetically engineering them to build ours.
The cracks are starting to show. Dean McCartney

The problem with reinforced concrete

Reinforced concrete is everywhere. But unlike plain concrete, which can last for centuries, reinforced concrete can deteriorate in decades as the reinforcing bars succumb to rust.

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