Articles on Congestion

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The Whim app seamlessly connects users to multiple transport modes in Helsinki – public transport, taxis, car rental and car/bicycle sharing. Aleksandra Suzi/Shutterstock

For Mobility as a Service (MaaS) to solve our transport woes, some things need to change

Apps that seamlessly combine all our travel options could be the most significant transport innovation since the automobile, but early trials show government policy support is vital to make MaaS work.
Cable cars grace many urban skylines, including this one in Portland, in the United States. Patrick M/Flickr

Look up Australia, cable cars could ease our traffic woes

Popular as gondolas in ski-fields around the world, cable cars, aerial trams, wires or ropeways are increasingly used for mass transit in progressive cities. Is this the future for Australian cities?
People use share bikes for many reasons, including health benefits and even because they like the design. Richard Masoner/Bay Area Bike Share launch in San Jose CA/Flickr

Share bikes don’t get cars off the road, but they have other benefits

Urban planners often hope bike-share schemes might reduce reliance on cars and help with congestion. But very few of those who use share bikes have switched from driving.
Cities are growing vertically as well as horizontally, so infrastructure needs to ensure people can move up and down as well as across the city. Alpha/Flickr

Growing cities face challenges of keeping the masses moving up, down and across

Cities are expanding upwards and downwards, as well as outwards. With urban density also increasing, moving people efficiently around the city, often using ageing infrastructure, is quite a challenge.
Central to Sydney’s congestion problem is the journey-to-work rat race in the city’s western suburbs like Blacktown. AAP/Dean Lewins

If the people can’t get to their jobs, bring the jobs to the people

Sydney, as a whole, is lurching toward an urban structure where its transportation problems are impossible to solve. The only alternative is to create new centres of employment.

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