Articles on Dying

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The holidays for many are not always about joy. Grief is a significant part of the holidays for those who have lost loved ones in the past year. Smileus/Shutterstock.com

The holidays remind us that grief cannot be wished away

Grief has been thought to present itself in five stages, but newer studies into how people process grief shows that, in many ways, it never ends. Grief can be especially powerful at the holidays.
If the bill clears its final hurdle next week, Western Australia will become the second state in Australia after Victoria to legalise voluntary assisted dying. from www.shutterstock.com

Western Australia looks set to legalise voluntary assisted dying. Here’s what’s likely to happen from next week

A marathon round of amendments and parliamentary debate will likely see voluntary assisted dying implemented in WA in around 18 months. It's time to start preparing.
In a research study, 84 per cent of residents and families who received a pamphlet about end-of-life choices felt encouraged to think about their future care. (Shutterstock)

To die well, we must talk about death before the end of life

The seriously ill and their families often want to protect each other from thoughts of death. Conversation about end-of-life choices are, however, essential to a good death.
A tangle of rules govern what to do when a California inmate dies. AP Photo

Who will bury Charles Manson?

If no one claims the remains of cult leader and killer Charles Manson, it's unclear what will happen to his body. Will it find an anonymous California grave or face dissection in an anatomy lab?
‘Green burials’ that use biodegradable coffins or lessen the environmental impact in other ways are on the rise. AP Photo/Michael Hill

Life after death: Americans are embracing new ways to leave their remains

Although 'Game of Thrones' -style funeral pyres are still out of bounds, Americans are increasingly turning to cheaper, greener and more meaningful ways to dispose of their loved ones' bodies.
Making death masks of notorious criminals was common in the 19th century, such as this cast of murderer William Burke at the University of Edinburgh’s Anatomy Museum. David Cheskin/PA

What we can learn from death rites of the past will help us treat the dead and grieving better today

Saints' relics, locks of hair, the laying of flowers: keeping the dead close took many forms in the past. We could learn from them today.
Knowing how to communicate about death gives us the language to discuss end-of-life topics with our loved ones. from www.shutterstock.com

Passed away, kicked the bucket, pushing up daisies – the many ways we don’t talk about death

We use euphemisms about death and dying to soften the blow of the real words, or because we feel awkward being direct. But this can lead to misunderstanding and confusion.

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