Articles on Eating disorders

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Queer men are using comics as a medium of self-expression to challenge, destabilize or embrace ideas about body image. Here, an excerpt from ‘Garden’ by Derrick Chow. ('Garden' by Derrick Chow)

Pow! Comics are a way to improve queer men’s body image

Queer men's comics are contributing to changing cultural narratives about what queer men’s bodies should be, and health researchers are taking note.
People with anorexia nervosa often see themselves as overweight when in fact they are not. This image depicts a young, thin woman who sees herself as larger than she is. Tatyana Dzemileva/Shutterstock.com

Anorexia more stubborn to treat than previously believed, analysis shows

Anorexia nervosa can be a deadly disease. A recent analysis of several studies showed that it may be even harder to treat than previously believed. But the news isn't all bad.
Eating disorders are very hard to treat, and those who have them often severely limit their food intake. VGstockstudio/Shutterstock.com

Eating disorders are hard to overcome, but ditching diets is crucial

In a diet-obsessed culture, eating disorders pose a severe threat. While the reasons for the disorders are varied, a consistent approach in treatment can help people stop dieting and feel safe.
Research shows that Instagram photos tagged with #eatingdisorderrecovery tend to feature thin, young, white, women. They also show stylized versions of food, reflecting a certain class status and engagement with “foodie” cultures. (Shutterstock)

Thin, white, female: How people document eating disorder recovery on Instagram

Instagram can offer a supportive online community to people recovering from eating disorders. It can also reinforce stereotypes of eating disordered bodies.
New research shows that even previously obstructive parents can be coached into providing vital support for their children with eating disorders. (Shutterstock)

How parents can conquer fear and guilt to help kids with eating disorders

A new psychological intervention can help any parents - even those crippled by fear and self-blame - to become powerful recovery coaches to children with eating disorders.

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