Displaying 1 - 20 of 137 articles

Herbert Diess, chairman of Volkswagen’s passenger cars brand, fronts the media ahead of his meeting at the European Commission. Yves Herman/Reuters

Volkswagen outrage shows limits of corporate power

Why would anyone accept that corporations could possibly be responsible and ethical in the first place?
Award winning documentary The Wolfpack raises questions about the ethics of documentary filmmaking. © 2015 Wolfpack Project, LLC. Madman Films

Wolfpack and the ethics of documentary filmmaking

Award winning film The Wolfpack tells the story of five brothers who've spent most of their lives confined to a New York apartment. It raises questions about the ethics of documentary filmmaking.
This Occupy Toronto sign sums up the sentiment, but people are also moving on from capitalism in practice by such means as digitally enabled collaboration and the sharing economy. flickr/Eric Parker

After capitalism, what comes next? For a start, ethics

While some find it hard to imagine life after capitalism, the digitally connected people of the world have begun embracing a new set of ethical concerns requiring new types of economies.
Most of us can’t bend it like Beckham, for various reasons. But is that necessarily the worst thing? Reuters/Ben Nelms

Why equality of opportunity is neither possible nor desirable

Rather than hold on to the idea of equality of opportunity, it might be more accurate to say that we don’t really support it because it comes at too high a price.
There is precious little dignity available for those Australians who are in the last stages of their lives. shutterstock

The slow politics of dignity for the aged and dying in Australia

The contrast between rights with dignity and rights without is increasingly apparent with regard to two groups of Australians: retirees and those in aged-care facilities.
Former SS member Oskar Groening, 93, is on trial, charged with accessory in the murder of about 300,000 people at Auschwitz. EPA/AXEL HEIMKEN / POOL

Oskar Groening and our own guilt for crimes committed collectively

Oskar Groening has declared his moral guilt as an Auschwitz accountant. His trial, currently underway, points to difficult questions about the implications of our own participation in collective activities.

Top contributors