Articles on Francophone

Displaying 1 - 20 of 33 articles

Protest in London against the Cameroonian government’s attacks on Ambazonia separatists. Karl Nesh/Shutterstock

How Twitter has been used in Cameroon’s Anglophone crisis

In many instances, social media appears to be amplifying violence, creating a culture of impunity when perpetrators are not held accountable, and increasing insecurity and suspicion.
Franco-Moroccan author Leila Slimani (centre) with the president of the Goncourt prize, Bernard Pivot (third from right) and others at the 2017 Frankfurt Book Fair. John MacDougall/AFP

Debat: How streaming media could change our minds on cultural differences

The influence of digital technology is most significant in how we experience culture and identity. Think about the use of streaming media.
A French-speaking Canadian volunteer in Haiti part of the volunteer group EDV that helped recovery efforts after the earthquake in early June 2010. Emma Taylor/Wikimedia

How Francophone scholarship deepened our understanding of democracy and social change

Scholars such as Alfred Sauvy, Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan and Frantz Fanon wrote in French, but their work greatly contributed to our understanding of democracy and social change in all contexts.
Senegal developed a diplomatic tradition after gaining independence from France. A.RICARDO/Shutterstock

The exception: behind Senegal’s history of stability

Senegal is important for Africa because it’s a country that shifts the narrative of the continent as an “arc of instability.”
Franco-Ontarians protest cuts to French services by the Ontario government in Ottawa on Saturday, Dec. 1, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Patrick Doyle

The Université de l’Ontario français: Here’s what it could become

Ontario's newest university serving a diverse francophone community will focus on the community's strengths and contribute to major contemporary issues.
The Gender Tracker Tool is used to see how well Canadian media is representing women’s voices. This stock photo depicts an example of journalists interviewing a female source. Shutterstock

Tracking the gender gap in Canadian media

The Gender Gap Tracker uses computational linguistics techniques to analyze how women are mentioned and quoted in Canadian media.
Luiz Capitulino,11, and his mom Sheyla Do Vale of Brazil embrace after becoming official Canadians during a citizenship ceremony at the National Arts Centre in Ottawa on Monday, Sept. 25, 2017. CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

It’s time to change the way we teach English

The language learning approach called "plurilingualism" empowers people to draw on many languages and cultural modes of communicating.
New Brunswick Premier Blaine Higgs is seen in this September 2018 photo. Higgs won a minority government, and must confront both language tensions and economic hardship in his province. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

New Brunswick’s linguistic divide is a microcosm of Canada

New Brunswick’s language politics have vaulted ahead of its teetering economic crisis to potentially become the central political issue in 2019.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford arrives to speak in Toronto on Dec. 12, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Doug Ford is wrong about minority-language services

Ontario's premier is drawing faulty parallels between Franco-Ontarians and Anglo-Quebecers when it comes to the services available to them in each province.
The view from the Montréal office of La Conversation Canada.

It’s here: La Conversation Canada

A unique model of journalism based on academic research and fact-based analysis is now being published in both of Canada's official languages
Québec Premier Francois Legault, left, exchanges hockey jerseys with Ontario Premier Doug Ford at Queens Park, in Toronto on Nov. 19, 2018. Ford’s recent cuts to francophone services in Ontario haven’t spawned nearly the media outrage that Québec language moves have. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young)

The English-Canadian media’s selective outrage on bilingualism

To read English-Canadian media, you would think that Québec’s anglophones are under greater threat than the rest of the country's minority language communities. Why the selective outrage?
French President Emmanuel Macron (C- bottom) poses with participants of the “Tech for Planet” event in Paris, on December 12, 2017, ahead of the One Planet Summit. Philippe Wojazer/AFP

France, the land of entrepreneurs…

In a recent Twitter post, French president Macron reminded the world that the word "entrepreneur" is in fact French.
Both first- and second-generation immigrants in British Columbia and Ontario outperformed their non-immigrant counterparts in science literacy, in the 2015 Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development Programme for International Student Assessment. (Shutterstock)

The secrets of immigrant student success

First and second-generation immigrants perform well in many Canadian provinces that take an "accommodation" approach.

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