Articles on Global warming

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Recent marine heatwaves have devastated crucial coastal habitats, including kelp forests, seagrass meadows and coral reefs. Dan Smale

Suffering in the heat: the rise in marine heatwaves is harming ocean species

Marine heatwaves, like their land counterparts, are growing hotter and longer. Sea species in southeastern Australia, southeast Asia, northwestern Africa, Europe and eastern Canada are most at risk.
The Rhenish Brown Coal Field in Germany. Germany is one of 18 developed countries whose carbon emissions declined between 2005-2015. SASCHA STEINBACH/AAP

Eighteen countries showing the way to carbon zero

Reducing emissions doesn't have to conflict with a growing economy, as these 18 developed nations show.
file djexsa. Money Sharma/AFP

Explaining the increase in coal consumption worldwide

While countries recognise the urgent need to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions by favouring greener energies, the ever-increasing demand for electricity has led to rising coal consumption.
U.S. President Donald Trump is seen visiting the California town of Paradise that was devastated by forest fires. Trump has threatened to use funds allocated for disaster relief to pay for his border wall. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Disasters and disagreements: Climate change collides with Trump’s border wall

Donald Trump has threatened to use funds allocated for disaster relief to fund his border wall. It's time to rethink how we frame disasters to stop politicians from using them for political gain.
The Soybean Free Air Concentration Enrichment (SoyFACE) research facility at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Claire Benjamin/RIPE Project

Together, more heat and more carbon dioxide may not alter quantity or nutritional quality of crops

Many researchers have studied the impact of carbon dioxide and heat on crop growth inside greenhouses. But what happens in the real world? One team has just done this and the results are surprising.
Evidence shows that the growth of air pollutants – as well as rising temperatures, increased rain and flooding – connect breast cancer with climate change. (Shnutterstock)

As the oceans rise, so do your risks of breast cancer

Most cases of breast cancer are related to environmental causes. When we talk about climate change, we must not forget this part of the story.
A farmer shows smaller-than-usual soybeans harvested due to drought conditions in Tallapoosa, Georgia. AP Photo/David Goldman

Reclaiming lost calories: Tweaking photosynthesis boosts crop yields

Many of the crop plants that feed us waste 20 percent of their energy, especially in hot weather. Plant geneticists prove that capturing this energy could boost crop yields by up to 40 percent.

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