Articles on Haiti earthquake

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Haiti had not yet recovered from its devastating 2010 earthquake when it was hit hard by Hurricane Matthew in 2016. It is one of the world’s most vulnerable nations to climate change. AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

In Haiti, climate aid comes with strings attached

Haiti is extremely vulnerable to climate change. It is also very poor. International donors have stepped in to help the country fund climate mitigation, but is the money going where it's most needed?
In this Oct. 10, 2018, photo, a man walks past a boat swept ashore by a tsunami in Wani village on the outskirt of Palu, Central Sulawesi, Indonesia. The 7.5 magnitude earthquake on Sept. 28, triggered a tsunami and mudslides. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara, File)

Why some earthquakes are so deadly

Last month's earthquake in Sulawesi, Indonesia was large, but not huge. It was the aftereffects that made it so devastating.
Hurricane Irma demolished Sint Maarten in the Dutch Antilles, in September 2017. The island has yet to recover. AP Photo/Carlos Giusti

How corruption slows disaster recovery

Corruption has made hurricane Caribbean countries' recovery less efficient and more expensive, new research shows. Misuse of funds may also trigger more disaster-related deaths.
While California’s shocking and deadly wildfires are a tragedy making headlines, future crises lurk beneath the surface elsewhere. Gene Blevins/Reuters

To prevent the next global crisis, don’t forget today’s small disasters

From California's fires to the Rohingya, headlines can be overwhelming these days. But that doesn't mean we should neglect so-called 'silent crises,' which can quickly erupt into global disasters.
Deleon Gambel, 14, fights the current from the overflow of Buffalo Bayou as he makes his way through floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey while checking on neighbors in his apartment complex in Houston, Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. AP Photo/LM Otero

Response to natural disasters like Harvey could be helped with game theory

The number of natural disasters around the world has doubled since 1980, raising serious questions about how to respond. Here's how game theory could help.
Buddhist monks and family members of victims of the Fukushima tsunami and earthquake face the sea to pray on March 11, 2016 while mourning the victims of the March 11, 2011 disaster. REUTERS/Kyodo

How disaster relief efforts could be improved with game theory

March 11 marks the anniversary of the Fukushima earthquake. Natural disasters here in the US also have wreaked havoc. There may be a way to improve response to these natural disasters.

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