higher education policy

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The year’s nearly ended, but we’re still not sure how to best fund our universities. from www.shutterstock.com

2015, the year that was: Education

2013 was the year of Gonski; 2014 the year of higher education reform; 2015 has been the year of … hmmm … wait, what actually happened this year? Just a lot of chat really, with much debate, but little…
A change in minister needs to mean a change in tack with regard to higher education. Sam Mooy/AAP

Four things the new minister should do on higher education

Higher education policy development should involve learning from the Abbott government's mistakes and other counties where university reform has been successfully achieved.
Saying we’ve the lowest funded university sector in the OECD doesn’t paint the right picture. Flickr/Information services @ Bond

OECD comparisons don’t prove our unis are underfunded

Many point out that in 2011 Australia’s public funding of universities ranked thirty-third out of the thirty-four OECD member countries. However the story is not so simple.
Simon Birmingham has announced the deregulation of university fees will be delayed until 2017 at the earliest. Sam Mooy/AAP

Education minister says uni fees won’t change for 2016

New Education Minister Simon Birmingham says the Turnbull government will abandon plans to deregulate university fees in time for 2016.
If Shorten wants to bring back compacts he should learn from the first time. AAP/Lukas Coch

Why does no-one seem to like compacts?

If a future government does decide to resurrect compact-like agreements, they should learn from the first two goes with them.
If universities increase their fees and students can’t pay their loans, should the university be held responsible? from www.shutterstock.com.au

Should universities have to pay back unpaid student debts?

ANU economists argue that Australian universities should have “skin in the game” on Higher Education Loan Program (HELP) debts.
The university experience means more than a piece of paper and a photo in a cap and gown. RMIT University

How do we value universities?

We value the boosted career and wealth outcomes for graduates and what that does for our economy, but university has more value than that.
Academics want to conduct blue sky research, but that’s not why people pay to go to university. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Keeping public priorities in public universities

Knowledge for the sake of knowledge is important, but universities, as public institutions, have a responsibility to fulfil their public role too.

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