Articles on Indigenous Peoples

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It is entirely unprecedented to have a sitting head of government admitting to ongoing genocide. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau during ceremonies at the release of the MMIWG report in Gatineau, on June 3. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Genocide is foundational to Canada: What are we going to do about it?

Political scientists concern themselves with ideas of democracy. Now that Canada's PM has accepted the finding of genocide, this changes how and what political scientists need to discuss.
An infusion of resources into local news outlets in Thunder Bay may help communities contend with recent reports of systemic racism against Indigenous communities. Shutterstock

Thunder Bay: Local news is important for conversations on reconciliation

Thunder Bay has received national press for its historically inequitable relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations. Local journalism could help the city face those challenges.
Maps can be a tool in the defense of Indigenous communities against extractive industries. Canadian Centre for Architecture; Grant Tigner, painter. Seagrams Limited, publisher. The St. Lawrence Seaway and Power Project, in The St. Lawrence Seaway: The Realization of a Mighty Dream, 1954.

Using maps as a weapon to resist extractive industries on Indigenous territories

Historically, western corporate maps have been privileged over Indigenous ones. But given the essential debate of territory in resource conflicts, maps are a crucial tool.
A case against Sylvia McAdam for ‘trespassing’ on ancestral lands in a provincial park was dismissed. McAdam

Law professor put on trial for ‘trespassing’ on family’s ancestral lands

A co-founder of Idle No More was put on trial for 'trespassing' on her family’s ancestral lands. Canada has much to learn about institutionalizing respectful relationships with Indigenous peoples.
Munduruku tribal people are demanding that Brazil’s government respect their land rights. AP Photo/Eraldo Peres

Amazon deforestation, already rising, may spike under Bolsonaro

Brazil's new president could clear the way for plans to develop remote areas around the Tapajos River basin over the objections of the indigenous people who live there.
Firefighter Jose Corona sprays water as flames from the Camp Fire consume a home in Magalia, Calif., on Nov. 9, 2018. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Using archaeology to understand the past, present, future of climate change

With the dire consequences of climate change looming, archaeologists recognize the importance of communicating their findings on ancient landscapes and the threats that face vulnerable populations.
The Blackfeet always faced their tipis towards the rising sun, including on winter solstice. Beinecke Library via Wikimedia Commons

What winter solstice rituals tell us about indigenous people

For indigenous peoples, winter solstice has been a time to honor their ancient sun deity. Their rituals reveal a deep understanding of the natural world.
There is a long history of ‘visual apartheid’ in the advertising of the outdoors industry – an absence of Indigenous, Black and other people of colour. (Unsplash/Esther wiegardt)

New ads ask, ‘Do white people dominate the outdoors?’

Canada's iconic retailer of outdoor adventure gear recently decided to change its mostly white image by diversifying the catalogue to better reflect the reality of its customers.
In this April 14, 1947 file photo, a long line winds toward the entrance to Morrisania Hospital in the Bronx borough of New York, where doctors were vaccinating against smallpox. In an attempt to halt the spread of the disease, officials said city residents were being vaccinated at the rate of eight a minute. (AP Photo/File)

The elimination of smallpox showed how humans can work together to solve deadly global problems

Humans have shown that together we can overcome daunting problems, including deadly pathogens like smallpox. It is a lesson of international cooperation and respect that we should pay attention to.
Maasai women on a conservation project in Kenya. Joan de la Malla

Indigenous peoples are crucial for conservation – a quarter of all land is in their hands

A new map shows that more than 25% of all land outside Antarctica is held and managed by Indigenous peoples. This makes these communities vital allies in the global conservation effort.
Tiana Schocko, from Peshawbestown, Mich., and of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa tribe, competes in the youth division of the 22nd Annual World Championship Hoop Dance Contest Sunday, Feb. 12, 2012, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Federal budget undermines Indigenous self-determination in sport programs

The federal government's 2018 budget allocates almost $50 million over five years to support sports programs for Indigenous peoples. The problem? The money is going to a non-Indigenous organization.
Indigenous, LGBT, Black and refugee youth are among the groups that are at a greater risk of cyberbullying than others. But youth can also be powerful agents of change. Clarke Sanders/Unsplash

Don’t be a bystander: Five steps to fight cyberbullying

Cyberbullying has become destructive and feels unstoppable. Here is a five-step technique for dealing with it.
Gates of the Arctic National Park, Alaska. Plants on the Arctic tundra absorb mercury from the air, then transfer it to soil when they die. Paxson Woelber

Mercury from industrialized nations is polluting the Arctic – here’s how it gets there

How do mercury emissions from industrialized countries reach the remote Arctic? Recent research shows that plants on the tundra absorb mercury vapor through their leaves, then pass it into soil.

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