Displaying 1 - 20 of 130 articles

Sydney Opera House is illuminated in the colours of the French flag in a display of solidarity after the attacks on Paris. AAP/Dan Himbrechts

Socially mediated terrorism poses devilish dilemma for social responses

Islamic State terrorism and propaganda are designed to provoke often predictable responses. We naturally respond with displays of outrage and solidarity, but we should beware the trap of division.
Calls for Islamic reform overlook the political motivations of extremism, and attack fundamental religious practices. Elias Pirasteh

An Islamic reformation is not the solution to stop extremism

Calls for a reformed, modern Islam will not combat the political and social motivations that underly radical and extremist ideologies.
Palestinian men pray in the Arab East Jerusalem neighborhood of Ras al-amid. Ammar Awad/Reuters

Is Islam incompatible with modernity?

Religion and modernity need not be at odds with one another, and many leading Muslim thinkers are plumbing early texts to promote progressive ideas.
A patrol in front of Notre Dame November 15. Gonzalo Fuentes/Reuters

Why Paris?

The answer is complex. But part of it lies in the fact that French society is still uncomfortable with its diversity.
Narratives of grievance are foundational to Islamic radicalisation. It may have helped motivate 15-year-old Farhad Khalil Mohammad Jabar’s actions. AAP

How are Western youth conditioned to commit terrorist acts?

Each individual case of radicalisation has its own characteristics. But the research has highlighted some patterns that may help to explain the dark world that is drawing in some Australian youth.
Danny Nalliah’s Rise Up Australia is one example of a far-right, ‘moralistic’ party that has sprung up in recent years. AAP/Joe Castro

Explainer: Australia’s tangled web of far-right political parties

Far-right movements and parties in Australia will continue to create interest, given their policies and method of operation. Their future longevity, however, is by no means assured.
Saudi Arabia has been careful not to appear overly oppressive of groups like Islamic State for fear of antagonising its own constituents. Reuters

What’s behind Saudi Arabia’s connection to Islamic State?

Saudi citizens supporting Islamic State are not the result of a coherent plan directed by its rulers, but the overflow of a long-standing system used to maintain its domestic legitimacy.

Top contributors