Articles on Job security

Displaying all articles

Some auto manufacturing workers, like those from Ford’s plant in Geelong, want to find work in manufacturing after the closure of the industry, a survey has found. Julian Smith/AAP

Ford workers willing but unlikely to find decent jobs: study

Auto manufacturing workers will face significant problems in finding new jobs after the closure of the Ford and Holden plants, a new survey has found.
Data from a recent OECD report suggests that to increase the number of jobs, the quality of jobs doesn’t need to drop. From www.shutterstock.com

Jobs don’t need to be lousy

There doesn't need to be sub-standard jobs in order for there to be enough jobs to go around.
How to protect your employment prospects as robots take over more jobs. Flickr/Chris Isherwood

Job survival in the age of robots and intelligent machines

In Australia, there are reports that up to half a million of existing jobs could be taken over by robotics or machines run by artificial intelligence. So with smarter computers taking on more of the work…
Workers who lost jobs at the Port Kembla Steelworks have faced mixed fortunes. AAP/Dean Lewins

The story of steel maps the job future for car workers

Prime Minister Tony Abbott is right when he describes Australia’s car industry workers as “highly skilled people, adaptable people”. He has also been saying this week that the departure of Toyota and Holden…
The impact of job loss on car industry workers is multifaceted, and those arguing ‘better jobs’ will emerge could be fooling themselves. Julian Smith/AAP

What the departure of Toyota, Holden and Ford really means for workers

People change jobs constantly, and the jobs lost in car manufacturing closures are insignificant in the context of total job changes - no different to everyday job changes. So say some commentators opining…
Just one more experiment to get that professorship. flseagrant

Thanks academia, soon I will join a generation of jobless PhDs

My friend leaned forward over the table where we were having dinner. It was a loud, busy restaurant, but she lowered her voice conspiratorially and her eyes took on a sheen of excitement, tinged with fear…
Joe Hockey has long extolled the virtues of hard work and the capacity for businesses to remain globally competitive, but an increasingly casualised workforce is exacerbating a divide between secure and insecure workers. AAP

Hockey’s work-hard mantra will hardly work in an era of job insecurity

The ACTU released the report Lives on hold: unlocking the potential of Australia’s workforce summing up the findings of its six month inquiry into insecure employment chaired by Brian Howe at its Congress…
Long-term job insecurity affects the quality of life for many women. vlima

Social policy can secure a better future for working women

Against a backdrop of international economic uncertainty, there are pressures for greater labour flexibility as employers complain of costs and reduced competitiveness with the high Australian dollar…

Top contributors

More