Displaying 1 - 20 of 54 articles

Kim Kardashian West does a good line in vocal fry … how does that affect the public’s perception of her? EPA/Peter Foley

Keep an eye on vocal fry – it’s all about power, status and gender

Much has been written about vocal fry in recent years, with the focus on what it is, where it comes from and what it means ... at least when it comes to females who fry. What's really going on here?
Amid the debate about what languages should dominate at African schools, we’re missing an important point: why do we learn language in the first place? From

We need to remember why we teach and learn languages

There are two functions of language: communication and access to knowledge. Each must be pursued as an objective in its own right rather than being lumped together.
Members of the Chitimacha language team (from left to right) Sam Boutte, Kim Walden and Rachel Vilcan use the new language software for the first time.

Renaissance on the bayou: the revival of a lost language

In the face of war, disease and outside cultural pressures, the Chitimacha language has survived -- and now thrives.
Minions, contrary to parental fears, have not been swearing at children – but why would that be a problem anyway? Daniel Go

Foul-mouthed Minions? Some myths about children and swearing

Parental concerns that Minions given as toys in McDonald's Happy Meals have been dropping the F-bomb raises an issue: how far – if at all – should we go to prevent children from exposure to "bad" language?
How much does the way we speak affect the way people perceive us – and should it really matter in contemporary Australia? Steven Mileham

Posh accents, discrimination and employment in Australia

Within Australia, there has historically been a clear social distinction between Cultivated (British-oriented) and Broad or General, distinctly Australian ways of speaking.
Liberalism means something completely different in South Africa compared with the US and UK, and has racist connotations. shutterstock

Navigating South Africa’s loaded political lexicon

Liberalism is a dirty word for the majority of South Africans. This goes back to early colonialism. Liberals opposed apartheid but not the close relationship between capitalism and apartheid.
Lest we forget is an expression with dignified origins, a rich history and a budding linguistic fossil. E-Maxx

Lest we forget lest: Anzac and the language of remembrance

This Anzac Day the words "lest we forget" will often be spoken. It's a usage that we don't otherwise hear. Why do linguistic fossils such as "lest we forget" linger – and how do they help us remember the fallen?

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