Literature

Displaying 1 - 20 of 276 articles

Both Hamlet and ‘True Detective’’s Rust Cohle make audiences wonder whether they’re deserving of sympathy or blame. Nick Lehr/The Conversation

In today’s most popular shows, Shakespeare’s iconic characters live on

The psychological complexity of Shakespeare's characters has rendered them timeless. Today, we see The Bard's influence in shows like 'Breaking Bad' and 'True Detective.'
‘All that is gold does not glitter, not all those who wander are lost’ - ancient Elvish verse of prophecy. Shutterstock/Serhii Bobyk

How to invent a Tolkien-style language

Quenya, Sindarin, Klingon and Dothraki – there's an art to making up languages.
EL James: the infamous ‘Fifty Shades’ author. REUTERS/Neil Hall

What makes a book ‘good’?

A poor review doesn't make for a bad book. But a good one doesn't make for a good one either.
Let’s critique the literary canon, but we shouldn’t throw the Brontës out with the bathwater. The Brontë Sisters, by Patrick Branwell Brontë, circa 1834.

Friday essay: the literary canon is exhilarating and disturbing and we need to read it

Like it or not, the literary canon is part of the cultural capital of the West. Universities that choose not to teach it – or refuse to critically engage with it – are actually disempowering students.
Discworld is a wildly inventive literary creation that sprawls over dozens of books. David Skinner

A beginner’s guide to Terry Pratchett’s Discworld

This Saturday it will be a year since Alzheimer's stole Terry Pratchett from the world. We mark the occasion with a beginner's guide to his most enduring creation, the 41-book Discworld series.
In the current publishing climate culture is always subsumed to business. Daniel Wehner

Publishing should be more about culture than book sales

The perception of publishing as a business, even a creative one, means that the question of book sales dominates our conversations about it. But publishing offers far more to our culture than that.
Jane Austen horror has burgeoned into a distinctive subgenre of adaptations. Kevin Harber

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: it’s the Jane Austen horror show

England’s green and pleasant land will be beset by a plague of the living dead, corpses will dig their way out of graves ... Jane Austen horror is now a distinctive subgenre of Austen adaptations.
The foot is the basic unit for what we consider to be romantic and beautiful: poetry. Khánh Hmoong

Explainer: poetic metre

Poetic terminology can be alienating, off-putting. Whispering "dactylic hexameter" in people's ears won't necessarily tempt them into reading heroic verse. But there is hope – and poetry – for us all.
On the anniversary of his death, we reflect on how J. D. Salinger’s writing first influenced the world and how it continues to do so now. July Morning | RU

Six years on: the enduring influence of J. D. Salinger

Today marks six years since celebrated writer J. D. Salinger died at his home in Cornish, New Hampshire, at the age of 91. But his influence remains well and truly alive.
Nigerian author Chinua Achebe, who died in 2013, wrote stories that offer students from all disciplines valuable insights about the world they want to fix one day. EPA/Frank May

How reading fiction can help students understand the real world

Students of the social and political sciences can benefit enormously from being taught literature, short stories and watching artistic feature films.
At the time of publication, Emma’s longevity was far from guaranteed. The Shopping Sherpa

Friday essay: Jane Austen’s Emma at 200

At the time of publication, the longevity of Jane Austen's fifth novel Emma was far from guaranteed. And yet, 200 years later, it now seems immortal. This is the story of its remarkable life.
In order to support his young family, William Faulkner took a job shoveling coal at a power plant on Ole Miss’s campus. Mussklprozz/Wikimedia Commons

Under the spell of a generator’s thrum, a Faulkner masterpiece was born

Slated to be demolished this year, a crumbling brick building on Ole Miss' campus once operated as a power plant where novelist William Faulkner shoveled coal – and feverishly wrote.

Top contributors

More