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The great detective’s purchase on popular culture was not always so assured. Benedict Cumberbactch and Martin Freeman in Sherlock, courtesy of Channel Nine

The Case of the Immortal Detective: Sherlock Holmes and His Enduring Appeal

As Benedict Cumberbatch prepares to return to 221B Baker Street for a Sherlock Christmas Special, a great, unsolved mystery remains: what is the source of the detective’s enduring appeal?
Publishers need to stop indulging in apocalyptic fantasies of doom and destruction. Kevin O'Mara

Parallel importation and Australian book publishing: here we go again

The Australian government yesterday announced it intends to repeal parallel importation restrictions on books, which has again caused concern in the publishing industry. But, really, what's the problem?
Gloria Steinem’s new autobiography reminds us of her work as a tireless grassroots campaigner. Here pictured with Barack Obama receiving the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2013. Reuters/Larry Downing

Setting the record straight: Gloria Steinem reflects on her legacy in My Life On The Road

In her new autobiography, celebrated feminist, activist and author Gloria Steinem seeks to set the record straight on controversial aspects of her legacy.
A recent exchange highlights the complicated nature of ownership when it comes to the Harry Potter universe. Luke MacGregor/ Reuters

Who owns Dumbledore – JK Rowling or the Harry Potter fans?

JK Rowling has come under fire for signing an open letter opposing a cultural boycott of Israel. The form of the complaints, and Rowling's response, tell us much about the author-fan relationship.
Marlon James, who this week became the first Jamaican to win the Man Booker Prize, represents a new generation of Caribbean novelists. Neil Hall/Reuters

A Brief History of Seven Killings heralds a new era in Jamaican writing

Marlon James won the Booker Prize this week with a book that focuses on the unrest and violence of 1970s Jamaica, a troubled chapter that continues to shape the island nation's present - and its future.
Every year thousands of students read George Orwell’s 1984 and are doubtless convinced that its perspective on language and power is “definitive”. Except that it’s not; and hasn’t been since at least the 1970s. Manuel Harlan/Melbourne Festival

Goodbye to all that: Orwell’s 1984 is a boot stamping on a human face no more

Many still regard George Orwell’s 1984 and its message about the nature of language and power "definitive". But globalisation has revolutionised how we communicate; 1984 tells us nothing about our future.
A new study examines the responses of Australian authors, publishers and readers to global changes in the contemporary publishing environment.

How to read the Australian book industry in a time of change

A study into the responses of Australian authors, publishers and readers to global changes in the contemporary publishing environment suggests authors are being innovative, but financial rewards can be elusive.
Claudia Rankine, winner of the Forward Prize. Jonathan Alcorn/Reuters

The white privilege of British poetry is getting worse

Claudia Rankine, winner of the Forward Prize, has provoked discussions about poetry and race in the US. Why are these conversations not happening in the UK?

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